Banner

Study Camp 1934

As a part of the new curriculum which was instituted in the late 1920’s, seniors were expected to display a “mastery” of the subjects they had studied. Comprehensive Examinations were instituted to measure that mastery. Another new idea instituted at the same time was Study Camp, one of the highlights of the senior year. The days would be spent hiking and studying. In the evenings, several professors, and often the President, would join the seniors for dinner followed by an in-depth discussion. The image above is from Study Camp of 1934.

The handsome fellow with the walking stick in the image below is John Gaylord Coulter, the man who innovated Study Camp.

Here’s another image of some students and their prize catch…

 

Beth Swift

Archivist

Wabash College

 

 

 

 


Junior Fence

Junior Fence

This is an image of the Junior Fence from the 1920’s. This fence stood between Center Hall and the Peck Hall of Sciences (where Hays Hall now stands). In this photograph we are looking into what is now the Mall. On the far left behind the fence is Forest Hall, to the right of that is the Tapy house, which were both moved for the construction of the Campus (later named Sparks) Center. At the far right of  the picture is the Wabash Power Plant, about where the flagpole on the Mall is today.

The junior fence and the senior bench were pretty seriously guarded. Each was passed to the next class during Class Day ceremonies at the end of the year.

I like this image because it shows us the Mall before it became the heart of the campus. At the time of this picture, this area was still functioning as the backyard of the College.

Beth Swift

Archivist

Wabash College

 


World War I

This is a picture of the barracks that housed the Student Army Training Corps of World War I. As America entered the Great War a program was created to avert the “Lost Generation” scenario that had played out in England while also educating the next generation of leaders. All over America there were units of the Student Army Training Corps. The men of the SATC were enlisted in the army, enrolled in college where their tuition and expenses were paid. In short, they were paid to drill and to study.

The barracks pictured here were located about where the Chapel is today and the smaller building between the others was the shower house.

 

Beth Swift


Center Church

Hello I am Beth Swift and I am the Archivist for the College. While keeping the history of a place as rich in traditions and heritage as Wabash I see lots of great images. In this blog, Dear Old Wabash, I will share a bit of the richness of the Wabash story as I post some of the more interesting images, along with a bit of historical context. This first image is a nod to our founders and the early days of the College. This is Center Church which was founded by the same men who founded our College. Just in the back of this image we can see a house peeking out from the church. It was to this house that Caleb Mills brought his new bride when he came to the “Wabash Country” as a teacher and a preacher. To place this image in its proper spot, I should note that this is the corner in downtown Crawfordsville known to later generations of Wabash men as the site of Tommy’s Silver Dollar…Below is a description of the church, and its many connections to the College, by President Tuttle.

 “Old Center Church occupied the corner of Washington and Pike streets. Its successor is ‘The Joel Block’ The old church was not stately or elegant…It had a basement and in front a wide and high stairway, leading to the main audience room….A score and a half of generations of students have used these steps to attend the President’s Lecture…It was also occupied occasionally for lectures and college exhibitions. And among these were the services of ‘Baccalaureate Sunday’ and ‘Commencement Week.’” President Joseph F. Tuttle in the Wabash Magazine of January 1895.

Below is a program from the eighth commencement held in 1846.

All best,

Beth Swift

Archivist

Wabash College



1 22 23 24