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Ezequiel Godinez ’18 The Blue Depths of Marketing

blog picFirst off, I would like to thank the Lilly Endowment program for providing me with such an incredible opportunity. I applied for numerous internship positions, but I was very excited when I found out I had been chosen as the intern for Blue Marketing. I served, over an eight-week period, as a graphic design/ social media “guru” for Blue Marketing located on Main Street in Crawfordsville. Blue Marketing is an award-winning, full-service advertising agency that serves a variety of businesses and organizations. With Blue being a smaller company, their size and expertise allow them to manage all of your advertising and marketing needs such as the following: marketing campaign, company brand strategies, and logos, and working on a single projects. Over time, they have retained many faithful and active clients that play a big part in their success! My time with Blue Marketing was a wonderful experience that I was extremely thankful to be a part of. I learned what “work-life” was like in the business aspect of the working world. I not only gained, but I also strengthen a few key attributes that will surely prove effective later on in life. I felt as if I strengthened my trustworthiness and independence with my employer by showing up on time every day to work ready to present my materials to my coworkers. I consistently offered any helpful advice with the topics at hand because I represented that younger audience that Blue Marketing, if they could connect with this pool of youth, could establish connections they would hope to develop over time. I got to study and research what today’s social media experts like and dislike in posts and images. With my position in the company, I was constantly on the computer. I revamped the company’s social media in Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram realms. I was able to bring my perspective on what “followers” and “friends” on these sites liked to see and mess around with. I brought lots of content, contests, and engaging information to these audiences and felt that I was very successful in my actions! Examples such a new page likes on Facebook and new Twitter followers furthermore proved the methods I was using were proving effective. I worked mostly on Facebook and one of my key projects involved the “building up” of the 2015 Crawfordsville Strawberry Festival. Bringing my creative/spontaneous mind to the table, I came up with a few games and ideas that proved successful and showed in the huge crowds the festival gathered over the weekend! The memories and picture I took are surely something I will not forget! Additionally, I learned to create different designs and edits through Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign programs on a Macintosh computer. I truly value these skills that I have gained throughout this process and hope to maintain these skills so they may be a valuable asset in my job search some time from now! Thank you very much for this experience to explore the blue depths of marketing and I am greatly honored to represent such a prestigious school in Wabash and such a great program through the Lilly Endowment! Thank You!

Maetrics and I by James Suess ’17

Suess, Jim Picture-BlogThis summer I had the opportunity to work on the fifteenth floor of the tallest building in the area. On my first, thirty-second elevator ride to Maetrics’ domain I remember being nervous, but maybe more anxious. I didn’t know what to expect. I was there for a marketing position, but I had never taken a marketing course in school, nor read more than a few articles online about the subject. To make things worse, I was told in the introduction meeting that the sole marketing guy for their firm had moved on to a new company just a few weeks prior. At this point, I doubted how beneficial this internship would be, but soon after they explained what I’d be doing for them.

Over the course of the summer, I was to be their social media marketer and utility man. Maetrics uses the social media managing service, Hootsuite, which provides a platform for businesses to organize and schedule automatic posts. For the first few days, I was gathering a sense for the industry to understand how things worked, and what kinds of articles to post. I quickly learned what is right for a tweet is not necessarily the best for a LinkedIn or Facebook post. I researched the best social media marketing practices by looking at competitors’ pages to see what they did right, and by sifting through the various articles on social media. We developed an employee engagement survey to help gain feedback from employees, and hopefully be able to take a few quotes for our LinkedIn profile. Another project I helped complete was reducing a 3,500-word whitepaper into a 3,500 character, one-page magazine advertisement. Every morning I would gather information on the life sciences industry and our clientele to send the management team a daily update. I was able to sit in on weekly HR meetings and even offer my opinion when I thought of a good idea. The recruiters asked me to create beneficial tag lines to put in a pamphlet that we will give out at conferences when trying to find fresh talent. The best part of my internship was the president of the company’s go-to guy when it came to research. Every week he would have new companies, people, and products for me to research, so it kept me on my feet and gave me experience in digging to find information.

All in all, I enjoyed my time at Maetrics, and would recommend this company to anyone. My coworkers made the office a fun place to work, and the management works alongside you, not over a top of you. I am grateful to the Lilly Endowment for providing this opportunity to me. I now have a better picture of what I’d like to do after Wabash.

Jeremy Minor ’16 Licensing For The List

 

IMG_0116As I wrap up my eighth and final week interning at Angie’s List, I have been reflecting on all of the meaningful experiences I’ve had since arriving on June 1. After spending this past spring studying abroad in Spain, I was very nervous about returning home and immediately starting an internship. Those worries were quickly put to rest during my first week because of the culture at Angie’s List, the people in my department, and the variety of my work.
Angie’s List has two locations in Indianapolis. The first of which is called the Landmark building that mainly houses the sales team. The second location, in which I am located, is a campus that is just one mile from the center of Indianapolis. The campus is small and very easy to navigate, much like the campus at Wabash. Each building is unique and houses one or a few different departments within Angie’s List. I work in the Campaign building, which is painted and decorated much like the building of someone running for political office. From the moment I walked in the door, I noticed the difference in culture that Angie’s List has. The dress code at Angie’s List is casual, so I was able to wear khaki shorts and a nice shirt on a daily basis and fit right in. This is much different than the internship I participated in last summer, in which I was required to dress professionally on a daily basis. While the dress code is more relaxed than most big companies, everyone still has to put forth their best effort in the work that they do on a daily basis.
This summer, I was given multiple unique projects that involved licensing for the Service Providers that use Angie’s List. I also ran a Daily Report for the new Scorecard feature that involved me learning some new skills on Microsoft Excel and implementing those skills on a daily basis. The project that I spent the most time on was the creation of a spreadsheet that details the unique requirements for General Contractors in all 50 states. I would go through each state’s General Contractor licensing requirements and determine details such as: how much it costs to receive a license, what educational requirements (if any) there are, and what type of insurance is necessary to obtain before performing and General Contracting work. As I wrap this project up, I am nearing 40 pages of information solely for General Contractors. I also created an Excel sheet that organizes each category and summarizes the requirements. This benefits the company in many ways, but the largest contribution goes towards those that perform audits on General Contractors. They can easily look through the database and know exactly what is required of a General Contractor anywhere in the United States and complete the audit more quickly and efficiently.
While I enjoyed the work culture and the projects that I worked on each day, my experience at Angie’s List wouldn’t have been as positive as it was without the people that surrounded me on a daily basis. The Fulfillment department was extremely friendly and helpful from start to finish. One of these people was Scott Morrison, a 2014 graduate from Wabash, who is working at Angie’s List as an Orr Fellow. Scott, along with my manager Bethany Hart were both great resources and I enjoyed working with them on a daily basis.
As I finish up my last day at Angie’s List, I am thrilled that I was given the opportunity to intern here for eight weeks. I’d like to thank Angie’s List, Wabash College, and the Lilly Endowment for allowing me to participate in this Internship. I will miss the people in my Department and the other interns that I met through the experience, but I am also excited to begin my senior year at Wabash.

Tyler Trepton ’16 Indianapolis Round Two

 

Internship PhotoMy second summer interning in Indianapolis has been a blast. I was hesitant last summer to live in a new place away from home and did not know of the emerging tech boom in the Indianapolis area. Truth be told I was excited to get back to Indianapolis this summer and work for another tech company in the area. After doing some research and hearing from other interns and people at career services they recommended Archon Apps. Archon apps is an app development company who focuses on eliminating the use of paper. Their products: Cirrus Security, Archon Safe and Cirrus have been very successful in the event security, water, and constructions business in eliminating the use of paper for these companies by creating customs forms for these companies which improves performance and makes it easier to track records.
Since my first day Tony Unfried the CEO and founder of Archon Apps a Wabash graduate from 2003 informed me of the main products Archon Apps offers and informed me of my project for the summer was to create a product called MyMobile, which replicates a company’s web site and transforms it into a custom mobile application anyone, can download for free on their smartphones. In this day and age with the amount of smartphones out there an easy way for companies to reach their customers 24/7 is to put something they see multiple times a day in the palm of their hands an app. So I was given an idea with one client already and told to make this your business and make it grow.
So with have I exactly done with MyMobile? Tony and I created a weekly plan with goals to keep me moving forward and to learn different aspects of developing a product. For the first four weeks, I did research on the product and other competition analyzing what they offer when it came to price and features and compared their model to ours to determine what our key focus should be. Also I looked at the customers and what should our target market be for this product with which we settled on companies who would use the app frequently to make changes whether that was a menu at a restaurant of a drink list at a bar or even golf courses, and there pin placements for the day. After the target market was found I set up meeting times with some great Wabash alumni to discuss the importance of technology in their field and if an app would benefit their company.

The second half of the internship I have been working on developing the website to drive traffic and to draw possible clients interest to the company. With the website up and running I have been following up and reaching out to more companies to gain interest and funnel to the website to check out what we have to offer. Finally, I have been combining my research into a complete business plan showing the work throughout the summer and the benefits of MyMobile.
It has been a privilege to work with Tony at Archon Apps; I would like to thank him for accepting me as his intern for the summer, and providing me with a great learning experience. Also, I would like to thank the Lilly Endowment Fund, without them none of this would be possible. Their partnership with Wabash College has and will continue to help young Wabash men continue to pave their way to a successful future.

Craig Brainard ’16 Life enFocus

enFocus-1020Last summer, I chose not to do an internship. I didn’t even look for one, and frankly I didn’t care to. I was set on taking it easy, and using my free time to relax. I took a lot for granted by not getting back on my horse after sophomore year, but I was simply worn out from having two intensive internships right after my freshman year. There are a couple of things I can look back on now, though, and say I have learned since the beginning of last summer that have helped put internships into focus for me. Hopefully, I can help provide some insights to people who are wary of putting themselves out there, or are hesitant to take on an internship.
Let me start with this summer. I had a great time in South Bend working at enFocus. The company name stands for “entrepreneurial focus”, but I love the play on words, and that in some sense my experience provided me with my clarity and focus going into my senior year at Wabash, especially surrounding my desire to become an entrepreneur after graduation.
EnFocus is a nonprofit consulting company that was founded, in part, to help reverse “Brain Drain” in Indiana. If you have never heard of this, you have now, and it is a serious problem for Indiana, long-term. Brain Drain is used to describe the alarming statistic that Indiana is 14th in producing talented individuals out of college programs, but we are 48th in the nation in retaining that talent after graduation. The foremost reason for this trend is that most people who have lived in Indiana their whole life, or those who may just be here for school, see far more benefit in getting out than staying in. Coming from someone who has lived in Indiana his whole life, I can confirm that there has always appeared to be more opportunity beyond the Indiana border than inside of it, but the passion and excitement I saw in South Bend is just one example of how this summer has provided me clarity.
EnFocus is doing a great deal to provide meaningful opportunities to talented students, to show the potential of South Bend, and Indiana, for the future. One thing they did for their interns, not just those working directly at enFocus, but also those that they helped align with internships for the summer, is provide a professional development series. The series consisted of one-hour talks every Wednesday afternoon on subjects spanning from project management to social entrepreneurship, and we even had a chance the last week to hear from Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend and have a discussion with him. One of the things he highlighted about South Bend is its connectivity compared to the cost of living. For an aspiring entrepreneur, the realization of being so close to Chicago and being a central hub for connectivity through fiber lines, all with the ability to stretch start up dollars four times as far due to the lower cost of living, makes South Bend ideal for a budding tech company. Indiana, in general, is becoming known as a place where innovative people are creating opportunities through connectivity, and I was thankful to be a part of that is happening surrounding enFocus, thanks to Wabash College and Eli Lilly for making the opportunity available to me. One of the most rewarding parts of my experience was working on a project that will provide even more meaningful internship opportunities to Indiana students in the future, as a service.
In closing, I am not sure where I will be after graduation, but Indiana is looking more enticing after this summer. To anyone who is looking for an internship next year, take a look at enFocus if you are interested in entrepreneurship or consulting with a focus on social change. EnFocus is unique in that it offers employees 30% of their time to work on their entrepreneurial ideas. This goes for interns as well. And anyone who is not sure about internships or putting themselves out there, you won’t know until you try. Internships are one of the best ways to learn about yourself and what you might be interested in doing after school. That value should never be taken for granted, especially when companies and organizations like Eli Lilly, Wabash College, and enFocus are doing so much to provide that value to you. When it comes down to it, internships are sometimes rewarding just to put life that much more in focus. Thank you to everyone who made this summer possible and such a rewarding experience, once again, Eli Lilly and Wabash College, but also all of the great people at enFocus and in South Bend.

Wesley Virt ’17 Playing for Team Lilly

Wesley SpencerBWhen I think about a team, I think about a group of people who have the same abilities and desires. Before becoming a financial economics major, I thought that the only way I could play on the team of impacting people’s life was through pursuing a medical degree. This team has direct contact with patients every day. They are the ones that make the difference. I slowly began to realize that this is not the case at all, and this realization has been exemplified every day here during my internship at Tx: Team.
Having an impact during an internship is one of the reasons that I decided to join Tx: Team. Tx: Team is a physical therapy company based in Indianapolis but does business in many different states. I remember speaking to Scott Benedict, the CEO of Tx: Team during the interview for this internship. He said that the intern would have the ability to speak freely and be treated as an equal member of the team. He also assured me that I would not be getting coffee for him. I never realized how accurate this statement was until I started the internship.

On the first day of this internship, I was introduced to all of the tools that are used for forecasting. I remember saying to Spencer Sherridan, the financial analyst, on the first day, “These tools are ridiculously slow. There has to be another way.” His response back was simple, “Find it.” So with that motivation I set off to find another way to compile the data and make the tools work faster. I consulted many different sources to find the best program to use that was not Excel. The answer came to me with a Microsoft program called Access. Over the next few weeks, I would transform the physician referral Excel sheet into a quicker, and more user-friendly Access version. My best friends those next few weeks became “Access 2010 for Dummies” and the Office Support website since no one at the office knew much about Access.

After many obstacles and challenges, I finally finished the new Access database. Everyone in the office was impressed and wanted to work on changing all of the forecasting tools to Access. This one simple example shows that even though I am only an intern, I had a major impact on the team. I also impacted the team in another way by using my skills from Rhetoric 290- Deliberation. I got the chance to compose a deliberation for associates to voice their thoughts on how to increase the enthusiasm within the company. This just shows the value of a liberal arts education. I had to use skills from a variety of different classes and backgrounds to accomplish the task at hand. I would like to thank the Lilly Endowment for giving me all of these opportunities to learn a new operating system and for allowing me to realize even as an intern I can have a huge impact.

In conclusion, this team that I work for does not consist solely of therapists. It consists of people from all different specialties and experiences with each member making a difference in people’s lives directly or indirectly. They practice hard to give everyone the opportunity to live the healthiest life possible. I am part of that team. Tx: Team.

Haopeng Yan ’16 Building a Co-working Space for South Bend

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Haopeng Yan working at his office desktop.

This summer, I was given this valuable opportunity to work 12 weeks for Union Station Technology Center in South Bend, Indiana. First of all, I would like to start this blog by thanking the Lilly Endowment, Inc. to fund this internship. Also, I appreciate my two bosses, Dr. Shane Fimbel’ 01 and David Stamper, for guiding my work no matter what/when I needed their help or suggestions.

Union Station Technology Center (USTC) designs, builds, and manages data centers, a co-working space, and high-speed network communications facilities for mid-sized local businesses to large enterprise and global cloud providers. The Infrastructure as a Service (IAAS) model serves as the backbone of our operations utilizing the flexibility in design, a highly reliable power source, and high-speed connectivity.

My main title of this internship is Marketing and Communications Intern. Working with Chris Stazinski’16, our main function is to help the company to build and brand their new coworking space – the Depot. After visiting multiple other successful coworking spaces in Indiana like Launch Fishers and MatchBox, we believe that the Depot can be a membership-based ecosystem designed for entrepreneurs, creative professionals, freelancers, consultants, and students. Our long-term goal is to create a hub to facilitate business growth and innovation by providing a facility for collaboration and mutual development. For a small monthly fee, our clients have access to our extraordinary amenities.
My daily job includes building and marketing the Depot. I helped and coordinated in planning and promoting for several events such as Taco Tuesday and Wednesday entrepreneurial talks to engage current and future members. In the meantime, I prepared and managed all membership and event communications, including membership agreement, Terms of Use, press releases, and social media sites like LinkedIn and Twitter. What is more, I worked closely with Chris to build our website on Squarespace. From designing the logo to building a sheet of events happening within the Depot, I practiced a lot of what I have learned about marketing from the winter externship at Elbert Construction. I would also like to thank Mr. Aaron Nicely ’06 for extending his help after the winter externship when I built this website in the past few weeks.

Now I look forward to the rest of this internship. It is evident that this internship grows my leadership in leading a great number of events, inspires me intellectually in building and creating the website, and further improves my communication skills with both coworkers and clients from different background. Again, thank you Wabash and Lilly Endowment for preparing Wabash men for a successful future.

Connor Smith ’18 Perfinity Internship

IMG_6816As the 2014-15 academic year came to a conclusion this past May, I found myself filled with equal parts relief at having completed my first year of college and anticipation for what was to come this summer. Similarly to most other college students, I knew that I would have to spend my summer working. Having spent the last two summers working as a busser at a restaurant, the idea of working all summer was nothing new to me; however, this summer was going to be a far different experience for me. Through the generosity of the Lilly Endowment, I was presented with the opportunity to spend the first eight weeks of summer as an intern for Perfinity Biosciences under the direction of Kevin Meyer (Wabash Class of ‘06). Perfinity is a small company located in the Purdue Research Park in West Lafayette, IN.

A great dilemma faced by modern-day chemists, biochemists, and other great researchers in the biotech industry is that while the equipment and experimental procedures used have evolved at an increasingly rapid pace, the methodology behind the acquisition and analysis of samples used has remained alarmingly archaic. It is in this unique niche that Perfinity has developed a business. To increase the efficiency of experiments, and ease the lives of other scientists, Perfinity has developed products that have cut sample processing times from over 10 hours to about 20 minutes. Along with fellow Lily intern Jake Norley ( Wabash Class of ’16), we spent the summer as a part of the research and development team at Perfinity and worked alongside the other scientists in testing current products as well as aiding in research that could contribute to future products at the company. Having only one year of chemistry under my belt at Wabash, I was nervous that I was not going to be capable enough to contribute to great work here, however, my boss assured me that the other employees had learned a lot of the science behind the work as they worked through it and not to fret. Sure enough, by the end of the 8 weeks, I had become far more confident in my scientific abilities and had learned volumes of chemistry that will be applicable in not only my future course load at Wabash, but also in attaining my goals of becoming a successful chemist after graduation. One exciting moment during our 8-week tenure at Perfinity was when Jake and I found out that the research we had done would be used to file a patent for what could potentially become a future product. While I cannot disclose what the patent entails, I can tell you that it was an incredibly rewarding experience to know that our work was able to help the company achieve some of its goals.

The small business structure of Perfinity allowed me to learn about entrepreneurship and running a small business in addition to all of the science behind what we were doing. I was able to take away lessons in marketing, sales, finance, and much more during my time here. I felt that this was a true extension of a liberal arts education in the sense of making me a much more well-rounded individual. I cannot express my thanks to the Lilly Endowment for making this opportunity possible for me and all the other Wabash interns who were able to benefit from it possible. This internship has provided me with insight into the field where I plan on developing a career, and I consider myself truly blessed to have had such an amazing opportunity and met the great people at Perfinity with whom I am lucky to consider now myself friends with.

Christopher Shrack ’16 Chemistry and Wabash Brewing

IMG_2682I was fortunate enough to spend eight weeks of my summer working on the northwest side of Indianapolis at a new nano-brewery called Wabash Brewing. I spent the last two summers exploring research in the organic chemistry lab at Marian University and the biochemistry lab at Wabash College; therefore, I was looking for something fresh to do with chemistry this summer. When I found this internship, I thought it presented a great opportunity to see how chemistry can be utilized in business and to experience the production of craft beer, which I was less familiar than its consumption.

There is a small office in the back of the brewery that the owners had set-aside as a laboratory to run quality control tests on the beer as it progresses through the fermentation process. Along with doing general housekeeping tasks, one of the goals for my internship set by the owners was to get the lab up and to run by the end of the summer.

During the first few weeks, it was nearly impossible to get to the lab instruments since the laboratory itself was doubling as storage space and was overflowing with mail, receipts, and other miscellaneous equipment. Unfortunately, an issue with production appeared around the same time the internship began. As it turned out, the grain necessary for brewing being milled on site before the brewing process began created dust that accumulated in the air ducts and fed a bacterial infection in the brewing yeast. This resulted in many beers turning sour during fermentation, which then had to be discarded. Since the owners worked full-time at other jobs during the week, this left a lot of cleaning for the other intern, Addison Hummel, and me to do in order to get back to the level of production that was expected. Each fermenter vessel was boiled and cleaned thoroughly in between batches, and the grain mill was moved outside to avoid further collection of dust. Additionally, we learned how to clean the vessels in which the beer was carbonated and the kegs the beer was stored in afterward. During this time, I was also able to run the taproom and interact with customers on a regular basis.

The most exciting part for me was learning the process of brewing beer from mashing the grain and adding the hops in during the boiling process to transferring the unfermented product, known as the wort, into a fermenter vessel and pitching the yeast with oxygen. Once the production issue was tackled, we were able to get rid of a lot of clutter in the brewery and the laboratory. The laboratory consists of a gas chromatograph (GC), a tandem gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GC-MS), a compound microscope, and a UV-Vis spectroscopy instrument (UV-VS). We determined that the latter two instruments were functional, but the GC and GC-MS systems needed to be professional repaired. Before the internship concluded, we discussed procedures moving forward for counting yeast cells using the compound microscope and for determining the standard reference method (SRM), or color of the beer, using the portable UV-VS instrument.

I would like to thank the Lilly Endowment for allowing me the opportunity to experience the inner workings of a business that has strong ties with science. I would also like to thank the owners, Matt Kriech, and Damon Carl, for allowing me to be a part of their dream in merging chemistry with the art of craft brewing. It has offered a truly unique perspective, and I’m looking forward to stopping by in the months and years to come for a pint and catching up with everyone I had the pleasure of working with this summer.

Elliot Burge ’16 A Step into the Real World

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Mr. Burge studying material on an office desktop.

The Who

I am Elliott Burge – a junior at Wabash College from Valparaiso studying economics – and, fortunately, a 2015 summer intern at Connecta Corporation in Indianapolis. I would not have been so lucky nor had this fulfilling experience without some help from a few organizations and certain individuals. Firstly, I would like to thank the Lilly Endowment for funding my internship and many like it and for making all of these wonderful opportunities a reality. Additionally, I would like to thank Wabash College – specifically the Center for Innovation, Business & Entrepreneurship led by Roland Morin and William Oprisko, Director of Student Employment and Activities. All of their time and efforts put forth smoothly set up and ran the Lilly internship programs available to me and many Wabash men. Lastly, my supervisors Alan Pyle and Derek Turner – both Wabash alumni – deserve recognition for inviting me to work with them and for challenging me in a way that allowed me to grow and learn in a workplace full of hard-working and inviting individuals. Each person, group, and organization played a vital role in my summer internship, and their collective involvement proved crucial in the support and guidance I received during my time at Connecta Corp. The memories and value to my education will surely be cherished and not forgotten.
The What

During my eight-week internship program, I faced not only many tasks and obstacles but also completed many goals and projects. The variety of roles and responsibilities given to me most likely exceeded those of the majority of other Lilly interns. I thoroughly enjoyed the frequent changes in pace and setting while on the job. From picking up and dropping off orders, to entering many different forms of data and organizing inventory, to orchestrating a company-wide cookout and utilizing my previous cooking skills, I could not imagine a more well-rounded and diverse job experience. Sometimes I would sit all day working with Excel, writing emails, or making phone calls; and other days I would do more physical work, such as moving inventory, mowing and trimming the lawn, or inspecting products as the machines produced them. I enjoyed having the opportunity to work with everyone at Connecta in one way or another and being able to apply myself on both sides of the business. Throughout my internship, I met a lot of great people who welcomed me and taught me so much. I very much appreciate all the lessons and knowledge with which these past eight weeks have rewarded me.
The When & Where
My internship took place at Connecta Corporation, which sits at the corner of Boulevard Place and 34th Street just north of downtown Indianapolis, IN. My time here spanned from May 8th to July 10th. I originally lived in Valparaiso, which lies in the northwest part of Indiana – as some would call “The Region.” Moving from a city with a little over 30,000 people to one with over 800,000 a few hours away, I had a lot of adjustments to make. Luckily I have friends who grew up and live in Indy, but the challenges of learning new streets and an entirely different city altogether still confronted me. I first noticed how much just driving around differed, most notably the traffic density and size. Despite that, I still greatly enjoyed the city of Indianapolis and all the wonderful things it offers. My experiences in and around the city indirectly related back my internship, and none of them would have occurred without it. Once again, I thank everyone who played a role in making this all possible. I learned a lot even outside of work about people, living on my own, and life in general, and that made all of my time here that much more worthwhile.
The Why
Some may wonder why I chose to work with Connecta, why I wanted to live in Indianapolis, or why I searched for an internship in the first place. I decided to look for an internship because of how competitive getting a desirable post-college job (or any job really) is nowadays. An internship provides very valuable experiences and awareness that separate prospective employees from ones with just their degree. I would rather be the best employee than the smartest. People have told me it is better to know how to use what you know as opposed to just knowing more than the person next to you. A quality college education and a good internship help individuals achieve not one but both of those. I felt that I needed to find an internship because of how much they offer. Secondly, Indianapolis seemed like the perfect location for me. I wanted to explore somewhere new and to excite away from home. Chicago would have been interesting, but that meant I would stay at home and have to commute by car, train, or bus 45 minutes to an hour away. I knew I did not want either of those, so I chose Indianapolis. Not only could I choose somewhere near my workplace to live, but I could also spend every day with some of my friends and have a summer filled with all new places and faces away from my comfort zone. South Bend – although a bit smaller – also seemed like a viable option with similar qualities and enough distance from Valpo. This brings me to my final question and answer: as I applied to several internships both in Indianapolis and South Bend, I began waiting patiently – a bit too anxiously as the end of the school year approached – and then I started getting replies to my applications. I received three or four emails in about three weeks’ time stating how I was not the ideal person these businesses wanted. Then almost out of nowhere I had an interview over FaceTime with Alan and Derek from Connecta. It went surprisingly well, especially since we scheduled it in the morning during my spring break. Before I knew it, I eventually walked out of my second interview at Connecta with a summer internship. Connecta was also the only place that interviewed me, so that made the decision a bit easier. My decision to take on a Lilly internship with Connecta Corp in Indianapolis instead of something else turned out wonderfully, and I could not be happier with the results – direct or indirect. I never thought this past summer would have played out the way it did, but there is not much I would change. In addition to everyone who had an impact and played an active role, I am thankful for everything this internship brought to my life and all of the lasting memories that came along with it. I can only imagine what else the future holds.


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