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Brian Parks ’17 A True YoungLife Leader

On The job photo6 Essential Things that Consist of Being a YoungLife Leader
First off, I just want to thank the Lilly Endowment for giving me this once in a lifetime opportunity of being able to intern for YoungLife. This was the incredible experience and one I will never forget.

Alternate Fundraisers
YoungLife is a non-profit organization so for it to exist funds must be raised. I found three ways to raise funds for YoungLife at Tech. The three were Restaurants, Activities, and Do-It-Yourself fundraisers. I created many proposals for YoungLife for Tech to follow through if they wanted to do a certain fundraiser within those categories.

Alumni Relations
YoungLife Tech has many alumni who are off into the world and doing their own thing, so it’s very important to stay in contact with all the individuals as much as possible. Sam and I created a spreadsheet with all of the former YoungLife affiliates, and we had about 150 total. We also plan to have an alumni reunion between August 1-12.

Job-Shadowing
Being able to job-shadow Christians was perhaps the best experience I encountered throughout the internship. I was able to shadow four wonderful people and experience a day with them at their organizations. I met with Jessica who works with MATS, which is a Missionary Auto Dealership. Tyler Sadek is a financial manager for TEAYS Investments, which invest in farms around the world. Phil Edwards is an assistant pastor at SOMA church; his job is to connect the neighborhood to the church. Lastly, Jack Nikcevich is a regional director for YoungLife, who oversees all YoungLife sites in Indiana and Kentucky.
Public Relations
During the internship, I sat in on a lot of meetings and gatherings with my supervisor. I was able to share my experience in YoungLife to about 50 people. I also talk to donors who support YoungLife about how YoungLife has changed my life and how it has directed to where I am today. I also attended a gathering of urban pastors around Indianapolis, who talk about how all churches must come together to change the community.

Video Project
Tanner Halbeigh and I are in the process of creating a testimonial video to show that the investments and generous donations of our donors are changing kids’ lives every day. We shot footage of B-roll, which consisted of my childhood home, sporting events, community, and much more. This will be a collaboration with myself and Jayion’s (current YoungLife member) testimonies.

Student Relations
I went to the school lunches about 2 to 3 times a week signing kids up for camp and sharing to them about myself. I attended clubs and Bible studies weekly throughout my internship that occurred on Mondays and Fridays. I shared the experience of being a Christian and going to college in front of 30 kids. Nearly every Saturday we would have work days that kids would attend to raise their funds to go camping and I attended nearly all of them. Work days consisted of anything from building a patio to cutting grass.

Jacob Stone ’17 Benefits of LABB

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Stone ’17

I would like to thank the Lilly Endowment for funding this program. The LABB Program thus far has been an amazing experience. I have learned so much from the program and it has made me more interested in owning my own business one day. I have met alumni with amazing stories and who continue to uphold the tradition of excellence typically found in a Wabash Man. What I have seen is that these men have fought hard to grow themselves as well as their businesses. I want to apply this to my business plan because while it might seem hard now there are things that will be much harder later. The exposure we have gotten from Joe Trebley and Tony Unfried has given me many new ideas that I can use toward my group presentation.

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Stone ’17 poses with for a selfie at JMI

This program has also shown me that a liberal arts education is very helpful to have in the real world. After Wabash I will be educated in many different fields and will be able to carry on a conversation in just about anything. This aspect is extremely important to the business world because networking and connecting with people is crucial if you want to start your own business. The LABB program is a great program and has become a fantastic talking point that I can use during job interviews or as an example of my experience. Before doing the program I had no prior experience and now I feel more prepared to take on the world.

 

Zachary Carl ’18 Alumnus Returns to Provide Excel Expertise

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Carl ’18

In the first two weeks of this program, I have gained an extensive amount of knowledge that will help my future endeavors into the business world.  This knowledge was only further enhanced by the teaching of a graduate of this college, Will Weber ’11, came into our LABB program to put us through a Financial Bootcamp.

As part of his class, we learned about the mechanics of Microsoft Excel and how to create an income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow.  During this Microsoft Excel crash course, we learned many formulas, shortcuts, and other helpful tips that will allow us to work much faster on our own Excel projects in the future.  During the process of learning about Excel, Will Weber we formulated the income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow for a shoe store inside a mall through the use of the formulas and referencing other cells.  He emphasized the importance of connecting information so that it was significantly easier and quicker to change information.  By referencing cells, we were able to make a change to one value and have Excel automatically make changes to all the other information for us.

By creating the statements involved in forming a budget, I was able to form my own financials for the restaurant business plan.  As I was worked on forming the income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow, I found the shortcuts and tips that Will Weber gave us very helpful.  The insight he provided about his own job and how he uses Excel was beneficial in that it showed us how this information could be used in the real world on a daily basis.

Prior to this week, I was not very sure as to how Excel played a role in the business world, but now I realize that it plays a crucial role in almost every business.  As I have began to work in Excel and create financial documents, I have found that it is interesting how every number relates to another number and have found enjoyment in changing individual values to see as to how they change the values in the entire spreadsheet.  I would like to thank Will Weber ’11 for putting us through his Financial Bootcamp and taking time from his schedule to educate myself and my fellow Wabash men.  I would also like to extend a special thanks to the Lilly Endowment for making this opportunity possible for both myself and everyone else involved in this program.

Jeremy Minor ’16 Licensing For The List

 

IMG_0116As I wrap up my eighth and final week interning at Angie’s List, I have been reflecting on all of the meaningful experiences I’ve had since arriving on June 1. After spending this past spring studying abroad in Spain, I was very nervous about returning home and immediately starting an internship. Those worries were quickly put to rest during my first week because of the culture at Angie’s List, the people in my department, and the variety of my work.
Angie’s List has two locations in Indianapolis. The first of which is called the Landmark building that mainly houses the sales team. The second location, in which I am located, is a campus that is just one mile from the center of Indianapolis. The campus is small and very easy to navigate, much like the campus at Wabash. Each building is unique and houses one or a few different departments within Angie’s List. I work in the Campaign building, which is painted and decorated much like the building of someone running for political office. From the moment I walked in the door, I noticed the difference in culture that Angie’s List has. The dress code at Angie’s List is casual, so I was able to wear khaki shorts and a nice shirt on a daily basis and fit right in. This is much different than the internship I participated in last summer, in which I was required to dress professionally on a daily basis. While the dress code is more relaxed than most big companies, everyone still has to put forth their best effort in the work that they do on a daily basis.
This summer, I was given multiple unique projects that involved licensing for the Service Providers that use Angie’s List. I also ran a Daily Report for the new Scorecard feature that involved me learning some new skills on Microsoft Excel and implementing those skills on a daily basis. The project that I spent the most time on was the creation of a spreadsheet that details the unique requirements for General Contractors in all 50 states. I would go through each state’s General Contractor licensing requirements and determine details such as: how much it costs to receive a license, what educational requirements (if any) there are, and what type of insurance is necessary to obtain before performing and General Contracting work. As I wrap this project up, I am nearing 40 pages of information solely for General Contractors. I also created an Excel sheet that organizes each category and summarizes the requirements. This benefits the company in many ways, but the largest contribution goes towards those that perform audits on General Contractors. They can easily look through the database and know exactly what is required of a General Contractor anywhere in the United States and complete the audit more quickly and efficiently.
While I enjoyed the work culture and the projects that I worked on each day, my experience at Angie’s List wouldn’t have been as positive as it was without the people that surrounded me on a daily basis. The Fulfillment department was extremely friendly and helpful from start to finish. One of these people was Scott Morrison, a 2014 graduate from Wabash, who is working at Angie’s List as an Orr Fellow. Scott, along with my manager Bethany Hart were both great resources and I enjoyed working with them on a daily basis.
As I finish up my last day at Angie’s List, I am thrilled that I was given the opportunity to intern here for eight weeks. I’d like to thank Angie’s List, Wabash College, and the Lilly Endowment for allowing me to participate in this Internship. I will miss the people in my Department and the other interns that I met through the experience, but I am also excited to begin my senior year at Wabash.

Craig Brainard ’16 Life enFocus

enFocus-1020Last summer, I chose not to do an internship. I didn’t even look for one, and frankly I didn’t care to. I was set on taking it easy, and using my free time to relax. I took a lot for granted by not getting back on my horse after sophomore year, but I was simply worn out from having two intensive internships right after my freshman year. There are a couple of things I can look back on now, though, and say I have learned since the beginning of last summer that have helped put internships into focus for me. Hopefully, I can help provide some insights to people who are wary of putting themselves out there, or are hesitant to take on an internship.
Let me start with this summer. I had a great time in South Bend working at enFocus. The company name stands for “entrepreneurial focus”, but I love the play on words, and that in some sense my experience provided me with my clarity and focus going into my senior year at Wabash, especially surrounding my desire to become an entrepreneur after graduation.
EnFocus is a nonprofit consulting company that was founded, in part, to help reverse “Brain Drain” in Indiana. If you have never heard of this, you have now, and it is a serious problem for Indiana, long-term. Brain Drain is used to describe the alarming statistic that Indiana is 14th in producing talented individuals out of college programs, but we are 48th in the nation in retaining that talent after graduation. The foremost reason for this trend is that most people who have lived in Indiana their whole life, or those who may just be here for school, see far more benefit in getting out than staying in. Coming from someone who has lived in Indiana his whole life, I can confirm that there has always appeared to be more opportunity beyond the Indiana border than inside of it, but the passion and excitement I saw in South Bend is just one example of how this summer has provided me clarity.
EnFocus is doing a great deal to provide meaningful opportunities to talented students, to show the potential of South Bend, and Indiana, for the future. One thing they did for their interns, not just those working directly at enFocus, but also those that they helped align with internships for the summer, is provide a professional development series. The series consisted of one-hour talks every Wednesday afternoon on subjects spanning from project management to social entrepreneurship, and we even had a chance the last week to hear from Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend and have a discussion with him. One of the things he highlighted about South Bend is its connectivity compared to the cost of living. For an aspiring entrepreneur, the realization of being so close to Chicago and being a central hub for connectivity through fiber lines, all with the ability to stretch start up dollars four times as far due to the lower cost of living, makes South Bend ideal for a budding tech company. Indiana, in general, is becoming known as a place where innovative people are creating opportunities through connectivity, and I was thankful to be a part of that is happening surrounding enFocus, thanks to Wabash College and Eli Lilly for making the opportunity available to me. One of the most rewarding parts of my experience was working on a project that will provide even more meaningful internship opportunities to Indiana students in the future, as a service.
In closing, I am not sure where I will be after graduation, but Indiana is looking more enticing after this summer. To anyone who is looking for an internship next year, take a look at enFocus if you are interested in entrepreneurship or consulting with a focus on social change. EnFocus is unique in that it offers employees 30% of their time to work on their entrepreneurial ideas. This goes for interns as well. And anyone who is not sure about internships or putting themselves out there, you won’t know until you try. Internships are one of the best ways to learn about yourself and what you might be interested in doing after school. That value should never be taken for granted, especially when companies and organizations like Eli Lilly, Wabash College, and enFocus are doing so much to provide that value to you. When it comes down to it, internships are sometimes rewarding just to put life that much more in focus. Thank you to everyone who made this summer possible and such a rewarding experience, once again, Eli Lilly and Wabash College, but also all of the great people at enFocus and in South Bend.

Cole Crouch ’17 SBIF Cements Career Goals

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Jason Bridges ’98, Courtney Bridges (wife and business partner) of Nantucket Bike Tours with Wabash interns Cole Crouch ’17 and Michael Haffner ’16

Hello, from 30 miles out to sea!

My internship at Nantucket Bike Tours with Jason Bridges ’98, and his wife, Courtney, has been informative, active, and transformative. I am learning and developing a working knowledge about small business in the hospitality industry. I am building more professional relationships and social skills than I ever could’ve imagined. Some of the skills include developing self-awareness as it relates to others and my own attitude, values and behavior patterns (like smiling more). Additionally, I am always striving to succeed at daily or weekly goals and challenges.

Throughout the last month and a half, the day-to-day experiences working at NBT have taken the small business aspect of this internship to the brink. Everyday, Michael Haffner ‘16, Jason, Courtney, and I, the NBT team, lead at least two bike tours – a town view and tour out to Cisco Brewery. But aside from leading daily bike tours, Michael and I are constantly developing social media campaigns, networking door-to-door with our business cards/brochures, creating advertising strategies with hotels and other local businesses, learning QuickBooks, editing the website, and booking more bike tours! Together, the NBT team makes simple and complex decisions in areas such as marketing, pricing, website design, etc., around the dinner table, over delicious coffee at the Handlebar Café, or during an intense game of euchre.

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Crouch applies some Small Business elbow grease to the NBT equipment

Learning how to effectively compliment others, as well as understanding others’ motivations, interests and desires have been the single greatest lessons I’ve learned this summer. In his novel, How To Win Friends & Influence People, Dale Carnegie stated, “The only way I can get you to do anything is by giving you what you want.” Every week, we are reading a new chapter in the novel and then applying Carnegie’s lessons to our everyday experiences.

Although I’m interning 861 miles away from Indianapolis, after just day 10 on the island, Nantucket began feeling like a second home. Ever since I arrived off the ferry, Jason and Courtney have fully immersed my fellow interns and I in the community and culture here on the island. Whether it is biking hundreds of miles around the island, running in a weekly community 5k run, attending the Maria Mitchell Red Tie Soirée Gala at Sankaty Head Golf Club, or volunteering on a Saturday evening at the Comedy Festival, we are continuously making our presence known as engaged community members and leaders.

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Crouch and Haffner with Courtney Bridges

Overall, this internship has challenged my goals and career ambitions in more ways than I ever imagined. My two dreams of owning my own business and becoming a lawyer have been even more cemented this summer. I will carry with me the experiences and lessons, as well as relationships and memories for a long time. I look forward to applying them in the future.

I would like to thank all of the alumni contributing to the Small Business Internship Fund. I am extremely thankful for my opportunity at Nantucket Bike Tours, which has been made entirely possible through the efforts of alumni at Wabash College.

Michael Haffner ’16 Takes “On” Nantucket

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Haffner ’16 with fellow Wabash intern Cole Crouch ’17

As I searched for internships this summer, I knew I wanted to do something unique that would have a lasting effect on my life.  I was longing for an internship experience where I truly had to “buy into” the business.  I wanted an experience where I felt like I could make a difference, learn lifelong lessons, and think on my feet.  My internship at Nantucket Bike Tours with Courtney and Jason Bridges ’98 has met and exceeded all of these expectations.

I have learned many things while leading bike tours around this beautiful island 30 miles out to sea.  The first lesson I learned was that, when running a small business, one must be “on” at all times.   Whether eating out at a restaurant, walking through town, or eating dinner at home while booking a bike tour for the next day, a small business owner must always be “on.”  In a tight-knit community like Nantucket, one must be smiling, friendly, and eager to seek conversation with others at all times!

Another valuable lesson I have learned thus far is to be involved in the community.  Whether volunteering at a local event, supporting a friend’s endeavor or even just showing up to town meetings, it is important to be involved.  Not only does this help create relationships you may not have had, but it also shows that you are a leader in your community.  We have been given the privilege of a Wabash education and in turn, we have an obligation to give back and lead when possible.

One of my goals for the summer was to become more comfortable and confident in social environments.  In addition to reading and analyzing Dale Carnegie’s How to Make Friends and Influence People, Courtney and Jason have put Cole Crouch ’17, Kazimir Koehring ’18, and myself in social settings where we need to interact with others.  We discuss the importance of body posture, eye contact, and confidence.  Being a naturally shy person, this was difficult for me at first.  However, after attending events such as the Maria Mitchell Gala, the Samuel Owen Art Gallery, and the Nantucket Comedy Festival, I have become more comfortable when seeking conversations and approaching others.

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Jason Bridges ’98 (center) with wife Courtney are hosting 3 Wabash interns through the Small Business Internship Fund in summer 2015. Haffner ’16, Crouch ’17, and Koehring ’18 are working in both of the Bridges’ businesses: Nantucket Bike Tours and The Handlebar Cafe, for a broad small business operations experience. Bridges have hosted many interns during their 4 years in the SBIF program.

In addition to these great lessons, I have improved my ability to think on my feet.  It is impossible to predict what will happen on a bike tour or where the day will take us.  When running a small business, one must be open to change and have a stable mindset when challenges arise.  Whether we’ve been picking up last minute bikes for a tour, fixing bikes, or scheduling last minute customers, I have learned to make quick, responsible decisions.

As a rising senior interested in a career in dentistry, I am grateful to be learning these lessons now.  Meeting different people on the bike tours each day, attending community events, and always being “on,” have given me a glimpse of the relationships, interactions, and insights that are all a part of running a successful small business.

I believe that my entire experience so far will enhance my ability to practice dentistry one day and will allow me to enjoy the relationships I build with my patients.  I am thankful that Wabash is able to provide great opportunities like this through the Small Business Internship Fund.  I see great value in experiencing a small business first hand and I look forward to learning more throughout the summer.

Boyd Haley ’17 Reflection on LABB

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Haley ’17

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Haley ’17 awaits his turn to present his business plan

With the last week of the LABB program we took a lot of time to work on our presentations for Wednesday. Tuesday my group spent a few hours in the CIBE work space figuring out exactly the way that we wanted our power point to come across and what information we wanted to convey to the investors. Having the CIBE gave us a place to get into the real business mindset. This was all in the preparation of our business plans on Wednesday. Wednesday we presented our business plans to a panel of 5 judges. Disappointingly my group did not receive as much funding as anticipated especially in regards to the amount of work and effort we put into completing it. When the judges were asking us questions about our business plan it made me realize that I had learned a lot about business the past seven weeks but also that I still had a lot to learn which I will strive to do. Before the LABB I didn’t understand all of the things that go into a business plan. Now I think that of I wanted to start my own business I have the skills to set up the frame work and the knowledge to pitch the idea to investors and run the business from the ground up. This is because we learned how to write the business plans from the ground up and incorporate all the factors. I would like to thank the Lily Endowment for giving me this opportunity to further my knowledge of business. Without the generosity of the Lily Endowment I would have remained pretty ignorant of all things that have to do with business and how I can apply my Liberal Arts education in the business world.

Parker Redelman ’18 Consulting Work

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Redelman ’18

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The LABB students await their turn to present their business plans inside the MXI

As the weather gets warmer and the days get longer, summer time in Indiana is in full swing. Unfortunately it also means this years LABB program is coming to a close and all of us are scurrying to finish our consulting and business plans. As deadlines draw near, we shifted our focus from case studies to polishing up our final reports. Along with our daily morning discussions over Shark Tank, the first half of the week was spent with us all working in our teams for the consulting projects. We wanted to make sure we offered beneficial and viable solutions in order to help both Dr. Drury’s and Dean Raters’ concerns they presented at the beginning of the summer. As we finished our consulting we began to work in our smaller business plan teams in order to discuss the final presentations to investors on this coming Wednesday. We wanted to make sure everyone understood what was going on and be ready to get started working on Monday. When the time for us to present our business plans came we all gathered in the MXI and awaited for us to present to a panel of judges. Dean Raters was present and opened up the presentation by explaining to the judges and other members of the faculty/staff who were present what we had been doing the past 7 weeks. He also acknowledged the work of Weston Gregg ’16 who had been an integral in making sure the entire LABB program was a success. After all the groups presented the judges were then tasked with providing funding for the proposals. When the numbers were all in my group’s app idea titled MealMaker received the most funding. I would like to thank the Lily Endowment. Through its generous funding of the LABB I was able to gain many valuable skills the impact of which I am sure will continue to aid me in all my endeavors.

Seth Gunderman ’16 Gaining Knowledge

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Gunderman ’16

This has been one of the most helpful programs through my Wabash career.  Being a Wabash student, it is hard to gain real-life Business experience other than internships or externships.  But the L.A.B.B. program has been a perfect segue for me.  Throughout the 7 week program I have added new Business lingo to my vocabulary as well as learned professional lessons.  One of the many great lessons was taught by Joe Trebley ’01.  Joe told the L.A.B.B. students to never say, “No”.  He reminded us that saying no only closes doors that have yet to be opened, but by saying yes there is a high percentage of more opportunities opening up for you in the future.  A perfect opportunity for us to apply this lesson was in our consulting project.  After watching some episodes of Shark Tank to better our knowledge of how to conduct a business pitch, Dean Raters challenged us to help the Dean’s office better communicate their roles on campus to prospective students, current students, alumni and parents.  Screen Shot 2015-07-15 at 1.29.41 PMWe were open to suggest whatever we found best for the school.  The first place where we found place for revision was on the Wabash College webpage.  After research was conducted, one suggestion was to simplify the website by changing the format.  This would help visitors better surf through all the Wabash College information.  We also suggested that a “People” page be created that would have specific bios and job descriptions along with a picture for each employee of the college.  We thought this would help students, parents and alumni remember who they were meeting while on campus as well as know their roles to the College.  Our last big suggestion was to hold weekly campus meeting called “Deans and Donuts”.  This would allow students to pitch their perspectives to College changes or potential changes, but also allow student to talk the deans in a more casual setting.  The L.A.B.B team is now just waiting to hear feedback from the judges on our proposals.  Finally I would like to thank the Lily Endowment through which I was able to gain this valuable knowledge and experience.


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