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Brock Hammond ’16 Historical Experience

Brock Hammond Summer Internship 2014

Hammond ’16 in front of the rotating jail cells

Brock Hammond ‘ 16 – I’d be lying if I said that I always imagined myself working in a museum, but working for the Rotary Jail Museum here in Crawfordsville has been one of the most fulfilling jobs I’ve ever had the privilege to hold. My primary responsibility as an intern is to act as a docent, otherwise known as a tour guide, for the guests of the museum. Not only do I get to see and experience new people every day, but the position allows me a taste of the field I would like to get into after my Wabash career concludes.

Doubling as the Montgomery County Jail and County Sheriff’s residence for ninety-one years, the Rotary Jail Museum provides guests with a unique window into the history of Montgomery County. While the jail portion of the building doesn’t typically change, the exhibits occupying the former living space for the Sheriff and his family change from season to season. This summer we are focusing on the “Roaring 1920’s: Flapper Fashion and Prohibition.” As a History major with a fondness for American History, I was able to bring some general knowledge of the time period to the position, and thanks to my coworkers and wonderful resources in the jail’s archives, I have been able to expand that knowledge to the point where I can speak intelligently on most everything in the museum.

I’m also doubling as the Montgomery County Heritage Alliance intern this summer, which is a coalition of local museums and art galleries. Only about a fourth of my time is dedicated to the Heritage Alliance so I cannot speak of it as extensively as the Rotary Jail. Thus far I have acted as a camp counselor for “Museum Camp,” which took a group of kids aged 7-12 around to all the local museums save for the Ropkey Armor Museum just on the edge of town. Currently, I’m working on some promotional materials for the various Heritage Alliance members.

Gierke ’17 Path To Law

Brett Gierke ‘ 17 – Working at the Law Office of Jeffrey Boggess this summer has been absolutely fantastic. Every day of work is different. Each client comes in with their own stories, which makes every case unique and interesting. Brett Gierke Summer Internship 2014

While at the office, I’ve had the opportunity to watch Mr. Boggess as well as his associate attorney, Scott Bieniek, deal with cases such as dissolutions, child custody, personal injury, a dispute about a land easement, issues that arise when a will is not filled out entirely, name changes, criminal activity, small claims, litigation, real estate, CHINS, paternity, protective order, guardianship, and wills and trusts.

Over the past six weeks I’ve been able to learn through many hands on activities. I have sat in on mediations and facilitations, written letters to other attorneys (which allowed me to see the style of writing an attorney would use), created exhibits for a court case, scanned case documents into the firm’s computer system, reviewed case files to prep for upcoming hearings; and I’ve seen how a lawyer conducts himself while in the office with clients, as well as while in the courtroom.

This internship has helped to enhance my liberal arts education by showing me you must remain open-minded in order to experience the big picture. After all, that does play a large role in what a liberal arts education represents. Having the opportunity to work here has helped increase my desire to go to law school. I’ve been able to see the effort a lawyer must put into his work every single day; but in the end, I feel it’s worth it to help someone in a time of need. I would like to thank the Lilly Endowment, Inc. for the generosity in encouraging internships in Indiana and providing me with this wonderful opportunity. I would also like to give a special thanks to Mr. Jeffrey Boggess (class of ’89) for allowing me to be his chosen intern for the summer and for showing me what a Wabash man is.

Groff ’15 Non-For Profit Experience

Ethan Groff ‘ 15 – First of all I would like to thank the Lilly Endowment for their funding, which makes this all possible, and Mr. Roland Morin, Wabash class of ’91, for recommending me to apply for this internship. Over the past 6 weeks I have been the Intern at the Mishawaka-Penn-Harris Public Library (MPHPL). So, I’m a librarian you ask? Nope, not at all! However, over the past 6 weeks I have been given the opportunity to be everything in the library except the librarian (Librarians need an MLS after all). In my brief stint here at the library I have been simultaneously exposed to the world of non-for profits, and the world of education. My internship is focused around a set of projects that my bosses want me to help the library with. These include; group projects, from website design meetings to a presentation and discussion of Hoopla (an online based resource rapidly gaining popularity with libraries across the country), to individual projects, such as working on a Social Media plan, doing research on other libraries to help us plan the most up to date programs, and then attending those Summer Reading programs. Some particular highlights include, walking alongside the library in the Memorial Day parade, a local puppeteer putting on a very funny show, visiting different libraries throughout the state to do on-site research, and creating the wireframes that will eventually become the Library’s new website. Every day presents itself with new challenges and surprises, and all of these different activities mean I haven’t had a “regular” day yet!

Ethan Groff Summer Internship 2014

Now of course one of the first questions people ask me is; are you going into Library science after graduation? The answer to that is no, but that doesn’t mean this internship hasn’t been extremely valuable and insightful in helping me discover what it is I do want to do when I graduate. I have seen first-hand what it means to be passionate about ones work. The Librarians here are very passionate about helping people find the right book, but more importantly are passionate about helping people learn. The joy on the faces of the librarians and children during the summer programs (and my own joy that comes from sharing these experiences) has been a powerful teacher. In a more professional sense, this internship has taught me many of the ins and outs of running a company. My boss is in charge of hiring’s at the library, and I have gotten to see the kind of time and effort that is put into hiring new members to a staff (even if I cannot be in the interviews myself).  Through my conversations with Dena (my boss), Donna (the Branch manager at the downtown branch, also technically, another boss), and Dave (The Library director, THE boss) I have been asked to weigh in on matters that affect the entire running of the library. The projects I am currently working on include, helping redesign the website and doing research for the 30th anniversary celebration of our Bittersweet branch (Penn Township). By the end of the summer I will also be able to add budgeting (finance), Public relations, and Marketing to my resume. Needless to say, even though Library Science may not be in my future, this Internship has been very beneficial to me.

Finally, this summer has taught me a great deal about myself. Because a big part of my Internship focuses on projects that I work on independently I have had the opportunity to find out that I can be an excellent self-starter. (I have also found that sometimes I am not!) I have found out that I am very passionate about helping people learn (I think I get that from my mom, a high school teacher). I have found out that I enjoy my job much more when I am working directly with other people. Finally, I have learned that one is never too old to enjoy a good puppet show. Have a wonderful summer everyone!

Jawed ’17 Hazardous Education

Bilal Jawed Summer Internship 2014 (Picture 1)

Jawed ’17 works in his MCHD issued HAZMAT suit

Bilal Jawed ‘ 17 - It’s hot in the Tyvek HAZMAT suit; because the gas mask I’m wearing is airtight, the usual ammonia odors of a methamphetamine-infected house don’t reach my nose. The bright yellow suit, neon green boots, and a double pair of purple gloves make me feel out of my element, but that’s expected interning with the Montgomery County Health Department.

My experiences interning with the MCHD can be summed up in one image: stepping into a shallow puddle only to find yourself drenched because that puddle was much, much, deeper than expected. I entered the internship with an elementary understanding of the role of the health department: checking restaurants here and there and possibly standing by in case of a health emergency. I quickly realized that the health department plays a much larger role in our everyday lives, whether we realize it or not. Whether we are taking a swim at the local pool, enjoying a taco at Little Mexico, or simply relaxing on the back porch, the health department is hard at work in the shadows – testing pool and drinking water, inspecting food temperatures, or adulticiding mosquitoes while we sleep (just as a few examples).

One of the lesser-known duties of the MCHD is overseeing the septic systems in the county. Montgomery County has both dense urban and rural areas, making a countywide sewer system inefficient. The latter groups, including 12-14 thousand households, rely on septic systems. Septic tanks are essentially individual water sanitation systems for households not connected to the city line. Solid waste is separated from liquid waste, which is then filtered naturally through the soil. While this may appear simple, there is a long and strenuous list of regulations the department must oversee. While the average citizen “flushes and forgets,” they probably don’t appreciate the intricate processes, preventing dangerous human waste from harming our health. Worldwide, 40% of the population, practices open defecation which can lead to health risks such as diarrheal diseases, the sixth leading cause of death in low income countries.

As a summer intern one of my goals is to monitor vectors of Montgomery County such as mosquitoes, which spike in the hot and humid Crawfordsville summer. Vectors are any organisms that are possible carriers and transmitters of infectious diseases such as bats, rodents, and your favorite mosquitoes. The vector program has three main components: surveillance, adulticiding and larviciding. Every proper public health measure begins with assessing the situation. The health department accomplishes this by setting traps in possible mosquito environments with human activity. These environments include locations with untreated or standing water without fish, shaded areas, and areas with sewer odor such as the water treatment center. After locating these areas, the Health Department places simple traps with bait and a vacuum. The trapped mosquitoes are then recorded, classified, and sent off to the State Health Department to be tested for West Nile. Areas with high mosquito populations and areas testing positive for West Nile are indicators of where the next two components of the program will be deployed. Adulticides are aerosol sprays that kill adult mosquito organisms on contact. Larvicides on the other hand, attack mosquitoes at their larva or pupa state. Larvicide comes in a solid form, which is spread throughout standing water. The mosquito vector program is proactive, keeping track of mosquitoes and West Nile before it’s too late.

Bilal Jawed Summer Internship 2014 (Picture 2)

I would like to describe an average day in the health department, but there is no such thing. This internship has kept me on my toes because it is essentially not just a single internship, but a multitude crammed into one summer. Just a few of the experiences include: forming a vector control program, attending council meetings, educating the public through newspaper articles, probing for lice, inspecting septic systems, surveying meth-contaminated houses, water testing, analyzing data, county mapping, dipping for larvae, and the list grows with each day. I may not be an expert in any of these (at least not yet), but I have gained a greater understanding and appreciation of our health. I would like to thank Lilly Endowment, Inc. and Wabash College Career Services for this amazing opportunity.

Antalis ’16 CineMagic Sportsline

Adam Antalis ’16- I am within the fifth week of my eight-week summer internship at CineMagic Adam Antalis Summer Internship 2014- a small company based out of Griffith, Indiana. The company creates Hollywood style movie posters of sports teams, players, and events. Rich Ramirez Jr. started this company after he created one of these posters after he coached his son’s team to a baseball championship, and the idea was a hit. Since 2010, CineMagic Sportsline has grown to supply these posters to Pop Warner leagues, high schools and middle schools, travel baseball, softball and soccer organizations. Growing up in a heavy sporting environment, I was naturally drawn to this company, and thought the posters would have been a perfect way to preserve those memories. After applying to many internship positions I accepted this one because I wanted to work with something that I was interested in and something that would bring joy to its customers.

Chet Turnbeaugh ’14 played an essential role in the whole process of my internship, even from the very first phone interview. He decided not to inform me that he was currently at Wabash during the interview, which makes sense looking back. Chet has been my main resource while working with the company and has been a great person to work with during this whole process. The daily conversations, texts, and phone calls we exchange have allowed me to gain an enormous understanding of how an expanding, yet still small company functions. There is always something that can be done for a company like such. Whether my job is to gather contacts and compile data sheets, or to have personal interactions with the clients, I have constantly been doing different kinds of work which increases my understanding of the how the business runs.

I would like to thank the Lilly Endowment Fund for the opportunity to have a productive summer, and an experience that has been one of the biggest learning experiences of my life. Also, Wabash Career Services was great within the whole interview process, as I found many different opportunities through them. There is no doubt that this opportunity provided by the Lilly Endowment and Wabash, is one of the best I could have asked for.

Hanes ’16 Hanapin & the PPC Community

Sam Hanes ‘ 16  - So this is awesome. I am in week four of my internship here at Hanapin Marketing in Bloomington and it’s been a blast!

As soon as I got back from studying and singing in Ecuador (also a Wabash occasion), I had two days to gather myself and get down to Bloomington. The first day was a great day for orientation, as I was able to sit in on REDBOP day at Hanapin. REDBOP is held once a month and is a day of research in which we all get together and discuss and present new topics and tactics that we have learned or problems that we have solved. The Director of Talent and Culture at Hanapin, Chris Martin, was my first contact as he guided me through the interview process and coordinated my internship. It has also been great to meet and interact with the CEO of Hanapin and Wabash graduate Pat East (’00).

I have really enjoyed my time at the office. All of my coworkers have been pleasant to work with and are always willing to help me out no matter how busy they are. Since the internship is Pay Per Click Marketing, the work environment is relaxed (they bump music in the office all day) and the employees are young and tech-savvy.

Sam Hanes

But it hasn’t all been rainbows and lollipops. Going into the internship, I had barely any marketing experience and absolutely no PPC experience. For those unfamiliar, Pay Per Click, PPC and Paid Search are all terms for advertising online (like on Bing or Google) where a company pays money for users to click on that advertisement. Hanapin specializes in digital advertising for their clients.  Without any experience, and without being extremely techy (for a young guy), the initial tasks were quite overwhelming.

I was finally able to get the ball rolling. Each day I worked with my mentor, Amanda West-Bookwalter, on learning new tasks. Each time I learn a new task, I get account managers that ask me to perform those tasks on their accounts. The amount I’ve learned about PPC and all of the work that Hanapin does for their clients in just four weeks has been incredible.  Despite all the fun and learning, I have still been put to work! I have:

  • Ran spelling and 404 checker audits for all of our clients
  • Put together congruency analysis and reports for enterprise-level clients
  • Performed a mobile audit for an enterprise-level client
  • Worked on keyword research for enterprise, small business, and retainer clients
  • Done landing page assessments for Conversion Rate Optimization
  • Run affinity analytics in Google Analytics
  • Worked on a keyword build-out for an enterprise-level client

These are just a few specific tasks I have worked on, not to mention all of the different software and PPC terms and tactics that I have learned!

I couldn’t be happier with my internship here at Hanapin. I’d like to give a big thanks to Hanapin, Wabash, and the Lilly Endowment for making this possible. I’ve become extremely interested in the world of PPC and the PPC community, and the company culture at Hanapin is something that I enjoy and appreciate. My first internship experience is something that will benefit me in the future no matter what path I take!

Chapman ‘ 16 Monument Chemical Equality

Cole ChapmanCole Chapman ‘ 16 - Before I dive into my wonderful internship, I would like to thank Lilly Endowment, Inc. for the funding that they have given me and that has made this internship possible.   I have been at Wabash College for two full years now and this is just one of many examples of the multitude of opportunities that present themselves.  My internship came through a last minute connection with a Wabash alumnus.  He was looking for an undergraduate student with chemistry experience to help him on a menagerie of different projects. I accepted the position within a day and was hired on at Monument Chemical.

I have been working for Monument Chemical in Indianapolis since the last week of May.  The internship is a catch all for Wabash alumnus Matt Kriech.  I mostly do data analysis and databasing for Matt, but that involves quite a bit of knowhow about the company and its products.  Monument Chemical makes polyols, which make up everything from the soles of your shoes to adhesives.    I was brought in and from day one could tell that Monument was different.  I met a lot of higher ups on that day, and had no idea of it at the time.  The company runs as if everyone is on the same level, whether you are a manager or a secretary.  I didn’t even realize what power Matt had until much later.  The atmosphere has been fantastic for an internship such as this.

Not all of this internship has been in Indianapolis.  They have a chemical plant down in Kentucky that has been in need of some repair, and the other intern, a lad from Rose-Hulman, and I were charged with some of the renovations.  We have made multiple trips down there and made even more connections.  This internship has given me the opportunity to meet so many people in the chemistry field.  And I owe it all to the connections that Wabash College and Lilly have created for me.

This summer has been a wonderful perspective into the real working world of companies which I had never seen before.  I owe it all to Matt Kriech ’00, Wabash College, and of course, Lilly Endowment, Inc.

Conti & Overton All-American Business Model

Joey Conti ’15 –  Hey All! It is week three of my internship here at the Overton Network and the small business brainstorming has reached a peak.

Jeremy Overton ’00 and I started off the summer by outlining some personal goals of mine. While we explored that concept of personal improvement this question came about: “How in the world do you market success on the track to a potential employer?” I think that student-athletes across the nation, in all sports, and in all divisions eventually run into this problem. When a potential employer asks you, “What kind of skills do you have that make you a suitable candidate for this position?” It won’t bode well for you to answer: “I run pretty fast, actually.”

So we set out to conquer this question in a small business setting and one of the first answers we came up with has its roots in the training that takes place for athletes who want to be great. We were able to identify 5 actions that an athlete takes on their way to greatness, that we believe a small business owner does too.

  1. Decide – The athlete has to decide on a plan and then make the actual decision to train hard
  2. Follow – The willingness to stick with the original plan without deviation or hesitation
  3. Trust – Trust in your plan and your coaches to do what is necessary to achieve your goals
  4. Visualize - The athlete has to be able to visualize the landmarks and goals and recognize them when they happen
  5. Celebrate – You have to enjoy yourself and know when to relax

Snapshot 2 (6-25-2014 4-07 PM)In the next few weeks I will be visiting with a number of small business professionals (we have been calling them small business All-Americans) in an attempt to refine this list using their philosophies on each of these subjects. In the end I am going to be able to use this information to put together the All-American Business Model (you see what I did there?).

Jeremy Overton is a Wabash Graduate from the class of 2000 and the owner of The Overton Network. He uses his network as a means of connecting people in the Haubstadt, IN community with one another. In fact, his expertise in strategic coaching and financial consulting has earned him the nickname, “Mr. Miyagi!”

Thanks to Lilly Endowment Inc. and Wabash College for making this whole thing possible.

Cheers,

Joey-san

PS – Be sure to check out Jeremy’s blog (click the Overton Network link above) for his perspective on the Indiana Internship Program, too!

Regnier ’16 Liberal Arts and Finance

Tyler Regnier ‘16 - This summer I am interning for Thane Bushong ’96 at Private Capital Management Group, Inc. in Noblesville, IN.  PCMG Inc. is a personal finance firm offering investment, mortgage, insurance, and financial advising services.  I am also working on efforts within PCMG’s sister company, Timberline Properties, LLC, a property management group in Noblesville.  My responsibilities come in a wide variety, ranging from tax abatements, to kitchen remodels, to investment portfolios.

I started this position with mostly soft skills, such as strong interpersonal skills and a detail oriented mindset.  My main technical skills included proficiency in Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel, which I gained from my statistics course with Dr. Byun.  Through this internship I have been able to strengthen both my analytical and technical skills, as I review investment portfolios and prepare presentations for various clients.  I have always been able to balance seeing and addressing the fine details of a situation while also keeping the larger picture or final goal in mind.  I have sharpened this skill by working on various projects in investments, and more so in real estate and property management projects with Timberline, LLC.

Tyler Regnier '16 (far right) with coworkers

Tyler Regnier ’16 (far right) with coworkers

Due to my diverse interests, I have now narrowed my career path.  At this time I am working towards a career in personal finance, law, or education.  From a young age I have held an interest in finance and investments.  Working at PCMG Inc., has enabled me to develop and strengthen that interest.  I am enjoying this position in personal finance, and I find stock research and portfolio analysis to be a invigorating activity.  In addition, the personal interaction with clients is a vital part of what draws me to personal finance.  I can certainly see myself in a full-time position similar to this internship.

At PCMG Inc., I have been handed a number of tasks that I know little to nothing about.  For instance, I am currently working on a tax abatement proposal for a historic building in downtown Noblesville that Timberline Properties, LLC will soon be renovating to create professional office suites.  This task is teaching me to handle situations with a steep learning curve, a skill which will be valuable in future positions.  Coming into this job, I knew nothing about local tax laws and incentives.  Through talking to local officials and business owners, I have been able to compile information on tax incentives to complete this tax abatement proposal.

My Wabash liberal arts education has enabled me to perform the wide range of tasks that this position requires of me.  Due to the wide array of subjects covered by a liberal arts education, my Wabash experience has enabled me to take on very diverse responsibilities as well as tasks which I initially know very little about. This internship has helped me further develop my skills and refine my career path.  I am very grateful that through Wabash and the Lilly Endowment, I am able to have this internship experience.

 

 

 

 

 

Purucker ’16 Classroom to Healthcare

Scott Purucker ’16 - It is incredible to think that my internship with Tx:Team is already half way completed. I guess what they say is true, time really does fly when you are having fun.  Not only am I enjoying the internship but I also feel that I am making, as President Carroll Nelligan always says, meaningful contributions to the company and their mission of allowing everyone to live the healthiest life possible.

Purucker '16 with Spencer Sheridan '12

Purucker ’16 with Spencer Sheridan ’12

This summer, thanks to the generosity of the Lilly Endowment, I have the opportunity to work as the Finance and Clinical Operations Intern at Tx:Team in Indianapolis.  Tx:Team is a nationwide therapy provider whose home office is located here in Indianapolis.  They have therapy sites in Indiana, South Carolina, Maryland, and Mississippi.  I have been fortunate enough to visit several of the sites located here in Indiana and meet many therapists who are often the face of the company.  Prior to the start of my internship at Tx:Team, I had little knowledge of the therapy and healthcare industries, but thanks to the patience and knowledge of all the employees of the home office as well as copious amounts of reading, I have grown to have a much better understanding.

My daily tasks at Tx:Team include updating several key metrics and compiling reports on these metrics, as well as attending meetings about the direction of the company in the future.  In addition to these daily tasks, I have been working on several larger projects.  These projects include creating a dashboard to better track the success of different therapy sites and creating a presentation regarding a new coding system that will be implemented soon.  Both of these projects have allowed me to contribute meaningful work to the home office and I have learned a great deal from them.  I have used quite a bit of my knowledge from classes at Wabash College for both of these projects.  Most of all, my use of Microsoft Excel.  Not only have I used the tools that I learned in the classroom, but I have also used critical thinking to make my way through these projects. I look forward to completing these tasks and taking on new tasks to help Tx:Team.

I am working with three fellow Wabash men at Tx:Team: Scott Benedict ’98, Spencer Sheridan ’12, and Patrick Bryant ’16.  Each of them have been very helpful in guiding me as I work and are a large reason for my incredible experience thus far.