“Hey, Wabash!”

Richard Paige – We talk often of connections at Wabash, and I’m still caught off guard at times at how the shared experience of being a Wabash man makes for seemingly instant friendships.

I had lunch with Larry Haugh ’66 and Jeff Callane ‘94 while spending New Year’s in Burlington, Vt., and enjoyed an easygoing conversation that lasted more than 90 minutes over pizza not too far from the shores of Lake Champlain.

Math majors each and Indiana natives, Haugh and Callane took slightly different routes to Burlington.

Haugh, a Kappa Sig, is professor emeritus of statistics at the University of Vermont, having retired as department head in 2006. As he said, “I loved every part of my job, but it had too many parts between the teaching, administration, and research. There were times when I needed more sleep.”

Larry Haugh (left) and Jeff Callane on St. Paul Street in Burlington, VT.

Larry Haugh (left) and Jeff Callane on St. Paul Street in Burlington, VT.

Callane, a Sigma Chi, followed his other brother, James ’92, to Crawfordsville to play tennis for George Davis (“Holy cow, there is a Callane who can volley,” is what Davis is reported to have said upon seeing the younger Callane play for the first time). He’s now an account executive for Aon, the global insurance and risk management provider.

Separated by 28 years at Wabash, these two had never met, but you wouldn’t know it by the warmth of the conversation. They talked over the top of each other, finished thoughts, cajoled, and laughed…all the things that friends do when talking.

Having two guys at the table gave me the opportunity to present the Wabash Q&A to multiple people for the first time. Their conversation is below. I hope their conversation reads as engagingly as it came off in real time.


Me: What’s your favorite Wabash tradition?

JC: Oh man, I’d have to say…

LH: Definitely not the singing.

JC: You mean Chapel Sing? It is the most ingrained.

LH: That’s emphasized at Big Bash. Do you ever go back? They recreate the Chapel Sing, so that’s funny. Did they have the greased pole climb when you where there? Some of the traditions die out. Pan-Hel was a big tradition and party, so I assume that’s still going strong. Fraternities and living units used to put a lot of work into that with decorations and inviting your dates to campus. It was a big weekend. Otherwise, it’s just going back to the fraternity where I lived and seeing how that’s changed.

JC: Homecoming was always interesting, too.


Me: Life is full of successes and failures. To this point, what is your favorite mistake?

LH: I hate these kinds of questions. I’m a math major.

JC: (laughs) Maybe I should have gone to class a bit more often.


 Me: If you could cook one meal, what would it be?

LH: Any breakfast for me.

JC: Hands down, it has to be Elsie Burgers. Elsie was our cook at the Sig house. Oh, the Elsie Burgers.


Me: If you could give your 10-year-old self a piece of advice, what would it be?

LH: I do have an almost 10-year-old grandson and I would tell him to try a lot of different things and enjoy the trying of them. He’s doing that pretty well now.

JC: I would have to say, in the entire life sense, to be polite. Say “please and thank you”. “Please” and “thank you” go a long way. Do your best.

LH: That’s something we’ve worked on quite a bit with our grandson.


Me: Do either of you have a personal credo, and if so, what is it?

LH: Closest to that would be a saying that’s been passed down in my family, “Be yourself.” It was on a big log that used to hang in my grandfather’s cabin.

JC: I remember one thing – this isn’t mine – my first boss always said, “Hurry up and get it done, but take your time and do it right.” The M.O. that I’ve tried to live by my entire life works out like this: If you come in early, you’re going to stay late. If you come in late, you are going to leave early.


Me: If in your dreams you could have created one great piece of art, what would it be?

LH: I can only say what I like because I’m not an artist. I’ve always liked metal sculptures…

JC: Having the opportunity to study in Salzburg my junior year and getting a chance to go through museums in Germany, Paris, and Amsterdam, I can’t say there is any one that stuck with me. You know, Bob Ross, the old landscape painter – a little tree likes to live here – I’ve kind of tried a little oil on canvas. I’m not very good. It would be a personal landscape.


Me: If a picture is worth a thousand words, what are you doing in that picture?

JC: Oh man, I’ve got a huge grin, standing at the top of one of these mountains getting ready to ski down with my kids.

LH: That’s appropriate for me, too. I just love doing things with the family. Anything with the family is enjoyable.

JC: A big smile. When you see a smile like that, it’s infectious.


Me: If you could wish for one thing in your future, what would it be?

LH: I’ve been lucky to be healthy for this long, so I’d like to see that continue…to be able to actively travel.

JC: With an almost 13-year-old and a 10-year-old, I really just want to see them happy and successful with whatever they choose to do. Maybe there is a Wabash future for my son, Jack.

Speaking of connections, here is one more.

Callane and his family first moved to Burlington about three years ago. He was wearing a Wabash sweatshirt to one of his son’s tee-ball games when the coach approached him and asked about the sweatshirt. Callane wondered how the coach knew of Wabash. “I work with a Wabash grad,” was the reply.

Sometime later, Callane was with his daughter, Neeve, at her sixth-grade open house at Colchester Middle School when someone shouted, “Hey, Wabash,” as he passed by.

That’s when he met John Upchurch ’97, a teacher at the school.

“I stopped cold in my tracks,” Callane explained. “I meet John and realize that we were on campus the same time, and got to talking about the Phi Delts and the Sigs. It really took us back to campus. I got chills just talking about it.”

Callane and Upchurch since have gotten together frequently for Monon Bell viewings and such.

“Had I not been wearing that sweatshirt, it might have taken a lot longer to make the connection,” said Callane.

To bring this connection full circle, Neeve is now a student in Upchurch’s class.

10 Promising Trends of 2014

Steve Charles—As the editor of a quarterly journal, I tend to view the year’s significant events as being connected to larger trends and to the history of the College.

2014 had more than its share of those promising connections. Here are 10 I noticed as I gathered stories for Wabash Magazine this year:

burnett lores A Rhodes and Three FulbrightsJacob Burnett ’15 being selected our first Rhodes scholar since Jeremy Robinson ’04 coincided with Susan Albrecht’s first year in the newly created post of graduate fellowship advisor. Correlation does not prove causation, but for the past several years faculty and staff—from Professor Eric Olofson and his Graduate Fellowships Committee to Albrecht’s work this year—have become more intentional and focused on helping students obtain graduate fellowships. A Rhodes scholar and a record three Fulbrights—Adam Barnes ’14, Patrick Stroud ’14, and Sebastian Garren ’14—all in one year. That’s a promising trend.

riley pelton happy for winGolden Age of Wabash Sports—I had the pleasure of photographing the soccer team’s stunning 1-0 win over nationally second-ranked Kenyon in October, and that win led to a record-breaking season for regional Division III Coach of the Year Chris Keller’s Little Giants. For me it could be a metaphor for the entire fall sports season. A conference championship and play-off appearances for football, regional championship for cross-country, strong individual athletes in all sports, and honors and national respect for the coaches. And all built off the momentum of last spring’s NCAC track and field titles.

Wabash SID Brent Harris says it was the best fall sports season in Wabash history. Even tossed around the term “the Golden Age of Wabash Sports.” And he should know.

“That Floor Was Like a Fraternity”—That’s how Jim McQuillin ’72 describes the second floor of Wolcott Hall during his Wabash days, when he was mentored by fellow Wolcott residents Bill Placher ’70 and David Blix: “We were a brotherhood, and as tight a group as you could imagine.”

Those words came to mind last May when President Greg Hess announced the construction of new independent housing, due to open Fall 2015. Pair that with a new fund established by Clay and Amy Robbins that will support student-centered events on campus, then factor in programs that find increasing numbers of students doing their “student jobs” in businesses and organizations in Crawfordsville. It seems the quality and breadth of student life at Wabash is improving all around.

Matthew Deleget & David Diaoloreshoto by Rossana MartinezA Great Year for Wabash Artists—Matthew Deleget ’94 earned one of the art world’s great honors when he was invited to exhibit at the 2014 Whitney Biennial in New York City. Nathaniel Mary Quinn ’00 exhibited “Past/Present” at the Pace Gallery in London and earned critical praise and much notice both in and outside of the art world. (Read the Huffington Post and Brooklyn Reader articles.) Not bad for an art department that used to be housed in the Yandes basement!

All this in a year of transition for the art department. Filmmaker and painter Damon Mohl brings his own awards to his rookie year as a professor at Wabash, Professor Elizabeth Morton returns from sabbatical with more curating opportunities for Wabash students, and Professor Doug Calisch will celebrate his final year at Wabash with a retrospective of over 30 years of work next fall.

And while we’re talking fine arts, Professor Mike Abbott directed what may be the most remarkable theatrical collaboration I’ve seen in 20 years—a staging of Guys and Dolls that brought together music and theater departments as well as the campus and Crawfordsville. Contrast that raucous musical with Professor Jessie Mills innovative and well-received (as in standing ovations every night) production of the dialogue-free play Stage Lights. Just two of many reminders of the gift Wabash theater is to the College and the local community.

Then there was songwriter Dan Couch ’89, whose second hit with Kip Moore, “Hey Pretty Girl” went platinum in 2014, even as the songwriting duo was pioneering new musical territory for Moore’s second album.

Any prospective students out there interested in a Fine Arts Scholarship? They should be.

An English Department in Transition—Agata Szczeszak-Brewer delivered a remarkable and challenging LaFollette Lecture, Eric Freeze published a book of essays titled Hemingway on a Bike, Jill Lamberton taught the College’s first course in audio rhetoric, and Marc Hudson published more of his acclaimed poetry (an interview with him will be published in the Silk Road Review later this month).

Professor Emeritus Bert Stern was named an honorary alumnus and published his  “long simmering promise”—the biography of Wabash alumnus and pioneering American in China Robert Winter. Tobey Herzog’s final class before retirement was a wonderful template for others to share the works that fired their own passion for scholarship and teaching.

But Professor Emeritus Tom Campbell died in July. His class on the personal essay was the forerunner to our courses on writing creative non-fiction. I was remembering how Tom had returned to campus after his retirement for one of Eric Freeze’s readings, ever the supportive colleague. I know he believed the non-fiction writing courses were in good hands. But it is the man we miss.

Professor Hudson retires this year; Warren Rosenberg soon after.  The “old guard” made certain through recent hirings that the department will always be a great one, in the tradition of Don Baker and Walt Fertig, who preceded them. I wish I could be an English major here today!

But Stern, Campbell, Herring, Hudson, Herzog, and Rosenberg—those were vintage years.

Standing Really T.A.L.L.— 430 on 4/30,the Wabash Day of Giving in April, raised more than $465,000 in 24 hours thanks to social media and the tremendous response of alumni, students, and faculty and staff. (Many of those donors were first time givers.) The Annual Fund ended the fiscal year with its second highest total in Wabash history, and fundraising journals took notice.

President Hess had listed “expanding the culture of philanthropy at Wabash” as one of his first four objectives leading Wabash forward. Associate Dean for College Advancement Joe Klen’s creative experiment paid off (and no matter what they’ll tell you now, plenty of people doubted it on 4/29). It will be interesting to see what’s next.

Like a Phoenix Rising—When I arrived at Wabash 20 years ago the College was rumored to be considering dropping the speech department. Look at that department (the Department of Rhetoric) now! It has hosted Brigance Colloquia and other national conferences. Professor Todd McDorman delivered the 2013 LaFollette Lecture. And led by chair Jennifer Abbott, faculty and students have led conversations in Crawfordsville and other communities to address and work to resolve previously intractable problems. Assistant Professor 
of Rhetoric Sara Drury, inspired by Wabash legend W. Norwood Brigance, is director of the Wabash Democracy and Public Discourse initiative, which last fall hosted the first Public Discourse Summit with keynote speaker David Kendall ’66.

Classics, a department that took a hit during the Great Recession, is experiencing a similar resurgence. The 2014 Suovetaurilia turned the once insular department picnic into a reenactment of an ancient feast and a tasty celebration of learning for nearly 250 guests at Goodrich Ballpark between double-headers. One goal, as Assistant Professor Bronwen Wickkiser puts it, is “to make the ancient world more accessible for students, and to experience what the senses teach us about life in the ancient world.” Chair Jeremy Hartnett ’96, a former student of Professor Emeritus John Fisher H’70, as well as of David Kubiak and Leslie and Joe Day, is working on research with faculty from other departments, showing the innately interdisciplinary reach of the Classics.  And after retirement, the Days have stayed on to help teach courses and bring their expertise to the  curriculum. It’s quite a legacy!

“Doing Science” as a Way to LearnDean of the College Scott Feller was a newly arrived chemistry professor when I first interviewed him in the mid-90s. His Goodrich Hall office was packed with computers (parallel processors he used to create the “Little Giant Supercomputer”) and students. That day there were two in a space the size of a large closet, both working with Scott on his National Science Foundation-funded molecular modeling research.

Scott believes that students learn best by “doing science” alongside their teachers, that their questioning of assumptions and conventional wisdom can benefit high-level scholarship and research. He believes that sort of teaching and learning is worth the extra time required to include them in the work.

That model became the seed for the first Celebration of Student Research, Scholarship, and Creative Work (which he put together with Charlie Blaich) and has become a template for teaching across the sciences and social sciences, particularly in psychology. It’s reached the humanities, as well. It’s the way I wish I’d been taught in college.

Scott is also a hobby farmer and was hired at Wabash by another farmer, then-Dean of the College Mauri Ditzler ’75. Mauri thought it was no coincidence that so many scientists came from farming backgrounds. As boys, they had to learn to solve problems creatively and with limited resources—perfect training for a young scientist.

Scott being named Dean was an affirmation of both his collaborative way of teaching and his way of solving problems. And added another farmer to the list of Wabash deans!

Four to Watch—President Hess calls them “liberal arts plus”—four initiatives in which students apply and enrich their liberal arts education. I’ve been watching two of them—Global Health and Democracy and Public Discourse—since their inception. I’ve seen the conviction, passion, and teaching ability behind them. I’ve seen the difference they can make in the world. Knowing the people involved with the other two—Innovation, Business, and Entrepreneurship and Digital Arts and Human Values—I’m confident these initiatives will be equally transformative.

They will also give the world focused and tangible way to see and experience what a liberal arts education can do. Keep an eye on these four and your opportunity to be involved. I’m really looking forward to telling these stories.

“Taking Them Farther”—This one’s more personal to me, but it stands for something bigger. In September I took my grandson, Myca, to watch the Cole Lectures given by class of 2012 classmate Pete Guiden and Patrick Garrett in September. Patrick is Myca’s dad.

Patrick grew up in Crawfordsville but had never set foot on campus prior to his application to Wabash. He earned a spot on the waiting list but had to attend Indiana State for a year to prove he was Wabash worthy. Once here he thrived, thanks to his talents, his own determined effort, and the caring and skillful teaching of professors like Amanda Ingram, David Polley, and Jane Hardy. Now he’s working on his PhD at the University of Miami in Ohio; he returned to Wabash for the Cole Lecture to present his research.

Patrick’s visit reminded me of something I heard from Professor Emeritus Raymond Williams H’68 years ago in Center 216. He spoke of recruiting students with less than stellar academic records and “taking them farther” than any other college could. This College, he said, is particularly good at that.

I took that in faith when I first heard it from Raymond, but I’ve witnessed it as fact many times since, and none more profoundly than last September. I know what it means to Patrick, I know what it means for Myca.

When Wabash “takes a student farther,” we take a family, even a community, farther, too.

That, more anything else we do, makes me look forward to our work in 2015.

Junior Will Video Blog from Argentina

Howard W. Hewitt – In the always-changing world of social media, higher education continues to experiment and try new things. We have blogged, used most of the major social media platforms but never really video blogged.

Next semester Nathan Bode ’16, a former freshman blogger, will spend his spring semester in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Nate has been one of our better College users of social media and came to us with the idea of video blogging during his study abroad. We agreed it was a great idea.

We’ll post his blog url for the videos when he departs in February. But to get an idea of what he has in mind Nate check out his intro video.


Burnett ’15 Reflects on Winning Rhodes

Wabash’s newest Rhodes Scholar took to the pages of The Bachelor today to reflect on the process and winning the great academic honor. Here is his column written to and for his fellow students.

Jacob Burnett ’15 – I know you are tired of reading my name and hearing about this scholarship. However, I just wanted to take some time to express my perspective on this event. So, if you read anything about me in relation to the Rhodes, please choose this one; the words are mine and mine alone.

Firstly, the scholarship isn’t about Oxford or the 15 minutes of fame that stem from it. It’s not about the College or even about me. The Rhodes Scholarship allows certain students the opportunity to develop skills that teach us to fight for others: the students that never had a chance, the exhausted mother or father who needs support, the condemned, those simply struggling, and the forgotten. It doesn’t even have to be about changing the world; it does have to focus on how we, as the privileged, will help change at least one person’s world.

BurnetMugtMany Rhodes Scholars take the noble path of becoming professors: educating young men and women to become more than egocentric individuals – to care about the world around them. The individuals that I will come to serve will not necessarily place value on the fact that I was named a Rhodes Scholar; they will value the time and the energy I will invest into them and their lives – something too few of us forget to do in this busy world.

Secondly, something no one informs you about before you receive this or any other life-changing scholarship is the complex amount of emotions that culminate inside your soul. Everyone expects pure happiness, which is part of the equation, but it is not the sole emotion. I sat in a conference room with 12 remarkable students; each finalist equally deserved and earned this recognition. I had the pleasure of learning many of their stories and their goals. The Rhodes Scholarship selection committee on the evening of November 22nd had one of the most difficult jobs in this country: choosing two students whose lives will never be the same. After the chairwoman of the committee said my name, I was aghast and utterly speechless – you feel every emotion at once. You are stunned.

After reflecting on this entire process, I felt a profound sense of guilt that has followed me since that Saturday. Not the type of guilt riddled with connotations of negativity, but guilt that intimately connects with questions of “why.” It also comes with a special burden – now, if I fail in any sense, I’m the Rhodes Scholar that didn’t live up to the name. I don’t mean to complain in any way about this honor; I am overwhelmingly happy. It’s just not as simple as boiling the feeling down to elation. I had a whole Costco-sized humble pie. It reminded me to keep my head in the clouds but my feet on the ground.

Lastly, I want to make something very clear: if Wabash hopes to have more fellowship recipients, it must do more. I fundamentally believe that no college or university can make someone into a fellowship scholar of any kind. However, it can provide opportunities for students who have the necessary interests, skills, and passion to develop into the person who wants to fight the world’s fight. It’s an orientation of the spirit. Wabash needs more opportunities and funding for students to engage in research, ensuring that the Graduate Fellowship Advisor position becomes permanent, alternative spring break opportunities, meaningful and sincere volunteer work, and most importantly, Wabash needs to flex and attract academic muscles. These are not meant to be criticisms, rather, they are observations.

People want to congratulate me on this accomplishment, but it wouldn’t have been possible without the help of Susan Albrecht, Dr. Morillo, and all eight individuals who wrote me letters of recommendation: Dr. Jennifer Abbott, Dr. Michael Burch, Dr. Ethan Hollander, Dr. Robert Horton, Scott Himsel J.D., Arthur Ago J.D., Julia Leist, and Gina Paniagua. I am grateful for all the teachers (both in the classroom and out of it) and friends who never gave up on me. I’d like to thank alumni who have allowed me to intern with them as well as the generous donors who have funded many of my experiences at Wabash.

Finally, I will be forever indebted to my mother, Rita Burnett. A woman who has taught me more about compassion, love, strength, and courage than any person I have met; she is relentlessly noble. She loved me into being. This is our award.

I do not believe that the Rhodes Scholarship makes me special in any way or a better person than I was before the announcement. It allows me a chance to become a well-equipped warrior.

Hess, Raeburn Raise Alumni “Spirit” for Bell

Little Gian Head Coach Erik Raeburn

Little Giant Head Coach Erik Raeburn

INDIANAPOLIS, IN. – With the demise of the long-running Monon Stag, members of the Indianapolis Association of Wabash men established a new event – the “Spirit of the Monon Bell.”

DePauw alums and administration pulled out of the annual banquet and roast after last year’s event. Then the Indianapolis men swung into action and created the Thursday night event. nearly 130 Wabash men, significant others, and friends gathered at the historic City Market to celebrate the Monon Bell series. See photos from Thursday’s gathering here.

The IAWM welcomed President Gregory Hess, Coach Erik Raeburn and numerous college leaders joining area alums. President Hess lauded the support and enthusiasm of Wabash alumni and introduced the head coach. Raeburn took his time to entertain with self-deprecating remarks and a few jabs at NCAC officials.

He noted that “Wabash Always Fights” isn’t limited to the football team but every student who attends Wabash.

The group enjoyed small plates, Sun King brews, and the camaraderie of Wabash grads of all generations.

That Rings A Bell

That’s not tinnitus sweeping across campus, it’s only the sound of the Monon Bell tolling from the Chapel steps ringing in your ears. Below are the responses of Wabash men — both current students and alumni — when asked what was their favorite Wabash tradition.

Hezekiah Eibert ‘15
“I love Wabash and I love our traditions.  That is one of my favorite parts of this place.  If you were forcing me to choose, I’d say the guarding and the ringing of the Bell the week prior and the week after.  Homecoming is the pride of your house. Monon Bell is the entire campus – everybody alike – unified in keeping that Bell safe and making sure the whole town can hear it ring.”

Steve Ganson ‘73
“The Monon Bell because it was so much fun. My senior year was the year that a few of my former roommates actually stole the Bell from ourselves, from Wabash, and we blamed DePauw. They had it in their apartment and the uproar was unbelievable. They went into the gym and took the Bell right off the balcony there and took it to their room. That had to be the Fall of ’72. Sports Illustrated did a story on the game the following year and mentioned the incident.”


To the victor…

Wes Hauser ‘15
“Bell Week. The atmosphere on campus is a lot of fun – even the professors get into the spirit by making jokes during class time. Everyone is so chipper. It adds some spice to the semester.”

Ivan Koutsopatriy ‘16
“The Monon Bell. That one is usually a hard one for students because while you are studying anywhere on campus, you can hear that thing ringing non-stop.”

 Jared Lange ‘08
“Protecting the Bell and the interactions with alumni in that week.”

Jason Siegel ‘08
“My favorite week every year is Monon Bell week.  The campus just has a different energy.  The freshmen staying up ringing the Bell, guarding the Bell.  That’s my favorite tradition, the Monon Bell festivities.”

Brent Bollick ‘91
“Monon Bell.  We were 0-4 when I was there, so I kept going back until we won one, which we finally did.  That’s where I’m able to connect with other alums.  The tough part of living down here (in Jacksonville, Fla.) is just how easy it was to stay connected by going to that one game.”

Spencer Burk ‘14
“It has to be the Bell. It has to do with everything on campus. It’s bigger than a game.”


A Critical Eye on the Founding Fathers

I sat in on Scott Himsel’s Founding Brothers and Revolutionary Characters freshman tutorial recently, and plopped down in the middle of a lively debate. To observe was almost enjoyable as taking part.

I’m a sucker for the Founding Fathers and became intrigued with this class over the summer when Cameron McDougal ’12 said it was the most influential class he took at Wabash. After a few run-ins with Himsel and discussions about the class, he invited me to attend.

In this class, students are asked to discuss and debate a multitude of topics, first through the words of the Founding Fathers, and then by connecting those words to current events. To paraphrase Himsel, “the historical point and the modern parallel.”

Grant Wolf '18

Grant Wolf ’18

Himsel often asks students to argue in favor of perspectives they disagree with. It teaches them, Himsel says, “to walk around the entirety of the problem” McDougal took the class thinking he could rely on the words of Thomas Jefferson. More often than not, Himsel had him arguing from the position of Alexander Hamilton.

I enjoyed watching these guys think, reason, and react. At times they’d jot down notes or point a finger—that telltale response that informs the world, “I have a thought worth sharing.”

You could tell these guys were enjoying the process, at least as much as the thumb-worn, dog-eared, underlined and highlighted copies of “Something That Will Surprise the World” could attest.

Himsel poked and prodded his students through the discussion with his own questions: “Are you sure?” “Could you take that a step further?” He went so far as to pull out a dollar bill to make a point. He wasn’t stifling or correcting, but giving these gentlemen the freedom to walk around this problem.

Watching people think; to see the wheels turning – to see them reach for a book, thumb through a section, and look for just the right passage in response – is fun. Himsel brings the class to conclusion by relating the day’s questions to current court cases. Words from another century easily can be lost in translation, but these words still carry weight, even when borrowed by sitting Supreme Court justices.

After class, several students came forward and asked nuanced questions—they were not only engaged, but were developing a critical eye.

As this mid-term election season comes to a conclusion tomorrow, we’ve seen plenty of politicians cloak themselves in the language of the Founding Fathers. It’s reassuring to see this group of students grasping the importance of perspective in the ability to discern persuasion from political speak.

Social Media Changes Part of College Life

Howard W. Hewitt – The only constant in social media is change. Social media is here to stay. The only certain thing is that it will be different tomorrow, next month, or next year.

Facebook has 1.29 billion users worldwide. Twitter has nearly 300 million users around the world.

find-us-on-facebook-logos-1024x245Wabash Communications and Marketing has recently refocused its social media approach to be more focused and less of a shotgun method.

Here is an easy example to make the point. We used to post to Facebook 30-40-50 times a month but our reach, those who actually see the page, was quite low. That was frustrating so we took the advice of cutting edge social media firm, Blue Fuego, which serves higher education.

Immediately we cut our Facebook posts down to 12-15 a month, fewer links to take site visitors elsewhere, and we concentrated on engaging photos. The results have been overwhelming. Since Blue Fuego started measuring our engagement June 1, our level of activity has increased 151 percent!

instagram-logoWe’ve added several new social media outlets as well. Check out the photos on our Instagram page.  Be sure to follow our account and instagram_heart40 (heart) the ones you like best.

podcast-logoMedia Center Director Adam Bowen has written about our new series of Podcasts. Podcasts are ideal for travelers, business men on planes, and those who want an extended interview instead of a snippet. Read Adam’s post for more details on Wabash Podcasts.

While not exactly a social media tool, the College recently invested in a drone. The photos and video from high above 301 Wabash Ave. have drawn lots of attention on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

We’re always in the business of recruiting new Wabash men. We have adapted a popular social media platform introduced by Blue Fuego to just one other college. The Brotherhood is a fun and ever-changing look at the men, faculty and staff of Wabash College. Scroll through a few pages to get a look at the Wabash Community.

twitter logoWe remain active on Twitter with daily posts and nearly 2,000 followers. Our YouTube channel is where you can find the latest videos and every Thursday’s Chapel Talk. Our University LinkedIn page provides alums and all of the Wabash community to connect.

Social Media is an always-changing medium. What worked yesterday might not work tomorrow. It requires flexibility, creativity, and consistent messaging.

Hewitt is Wabash College’s Director of Digital Media.

Podcasts Offer Deeper Look at Wabash

Adam Bowen – The Media Center in conjunction with Communications & Marketing recently launched an institutional podcast called Wabash On My Mind, in honor of the book written by former president Byron K. Trippet. We’re excited about the unique possibilities of the format to continue to tell the Wabash story.

Laura Wysocki

Laura Wysocki

Our hope for this podcast is that it will become a place where long-form conversations take place between faculty, visiting lecturers, students, or anyone on campus with a compelling story.  We would ultimately love for the podcast booth to become a routine stop for visiting scholars to discuss their work, life, and scholarship while here on campus.  We have many people on campus with fascinating backgrounds and strongly encourage community members to submit proposals for podcast episodes.

The podcast is released every Monday at noon and can be found in iTunes by searching “Wabash On My Mind”.  We have also developed standalone apps for both Android and iOS.  The app can also be found by searching “Wabash On My Mind” in iTunes or the Google Play store.  The link for the podcast can also be found with our other social media links on the Wabash homepage.

If you are interested in scheduling a podcast interview, please contact Adam Bowen in the Media Center for details.

Wabash Men Have Fun Time for Good Cause

Howard W. Hewitt – Wabash leadership, faculty and staff take their jobs very seriously.

Wabash students obviously take their studies and extra-curricular activities seriously.



But at times we lament that we just don’t have enough fun. While that is arguably not true, we know there is always fun lurking around the next corer. A social media/pop music fad that started in Kentucky has swept the nation. So the long story made short is a group of fraternity men at Transylvania University in Lexington, Ky., set the bar really high with a no-edit lip-sync of Taylor Swift’s hit “Shake it Off.” By the way, that pop hit has more than 170 million views on YouTube. The Transylvania guys are nearing a quarter million views. The initial video challenged visitors to donate to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society/



Those Transylvania Delta Sigma Chi gentlemen really started something. The Challenge was created to get other colleges involved to raise awareness of a good cause. Colleges across the nation are now dancing to #CollegeShakeOff and #ShakeItUp. Students at Indiana University/Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI) danced to the Swift hit and challenged IU, Purdue and Wabash College. The Jaguars wanted to raise suicide awareness.



So when Wabash men are challenged, they answer the call. The craze came to our attention in the Communications and Marketing office. We turned it totally over to students Corey Egler ’15 and Nathan Bode ’16. Those two deserve all the credit along with videographer Austin Myers ’16.

They managed to talk students, faculty, and staff into dancing for the video. Oh, and their is a brief cameo by one administrator you might recognize. The Wabash men decided to raise awareness for Men’s Health – something of a tradition at Wabash during Movember.

Serious fun!