Banner

Leadership, With a Side of Bacon

Nearly 220 Central Indiana Wabash men packed the Ivy Tech Culinary Center banquet room Thursday morning as the Indianapolis Association of Wabash Men’s Leadership Breakfast honored Kelly Pfledderer ’96 as its Man of the Year.

Now in its second year, the event included a panel discussion with Connie Lawson, Indiana Secretary of State; Marc Nichols ’92, Legal Counsel & Director of Compliance, Rolls-Royce North America; and Jake Gilbert ’98, head football coach at Westfield High School.

Brandon Clifton ’06, the Deputy Secretary of State, introduced Canvas Founder and CEO Aman Brar ’99, who moderated the discussion that addressed civic and political engagement, mentors, and risk taking.

The IAWM Leadership Breakfast panelists included (from left) and Jake Gilbert ’98, Connie Lawson, and Marc Nichols ’92.

Lawson spoke early about the need to get involved in your community. She mentioned that even though many think of politics more broadly, a great deal of impact can be felt close to home.

“Participation starts young,” she said. “Not just at the national and state level, but locally as well. That’s where much of the political work happens.”

Gilbert, whose Shamrocks captured the Indiana Class 3A state football championship in November, was asked about how he deals with adversity, and how he shares those lessons with his students.

“Adversity is an opportunity,” he said. “It’s part of the process. You weather the storm and control what you can. Knowing that (adversity) won’t last forever, it’s about your long-term growth.”

When asked of career paths, Nichols told the gathering that simply having a plan was essential to his success.

“I knew from the beginning that I wanted to be General Counsel at a major corporation,” he explained. “I asked myself what do I need over the course of a career and all of those things become building blocks. I always have a five-year plan. Knowing what I am going to do next keeps me from fearing the unknown.”

He also spoke of the importance of mentors. Not simply on the impact they have on you, but on the impact you could have in another’s life.

“Mentors are incredibly important no matter how old you are,” Nichols said. “No one can figure out the path to life without mentorships. Be sure to return the favor because there are always people looking up to you.”

Pfledderer, the founder and former CEO of Apparatus, was humbled to receive the honor amongst a room of his peers and mentioned how Wabash aided in his success.

2017 IAWM Man of the Year Kelly Pfledderer ’96.

“This award is very meaningful to me because I realize how many people in this room are friends and colleagues of mine,” he said. “Wabash College built my confidence. I’ve always been a bit of a risk taker, but I’m a better risk taker because of the experience.”

Brar, a former co-worker at Apparatus, spoke highly of Pfledderer’s leadership qualities.

“His eye for talent, for great design, and for doing things the right way, combined with a willingness to empower people to accomplish great things shows that he has a lot of classic leadership strengths,” Brar said. “There is no one more deserving for his business accomplishments and for his commitment to the community, which is an even bigger statement about who Kelly is.”


Lasting Impacts

In this time of year when nets are cut and trophies won, sometimes the impact coaches and players have on each other is taken for granted. Not here.

Thirty-five years ago today, Coach Mac Petty guided the Little Giants to the last of 19 consecutive victories en route to the 1982 NCAA Division III national championship, the singular team accomplishment in Wabash athletics history.

In the end the game wasn’t close. The Little Giants shot 59 percent from the field, grabbed nine more rebounds than Potsdam State, and collected 24 assists on 29 buckets. Teddy Parker hit a jumper with 10:48 to go in the first half – his only field goal of the game – and gave Wabash a lead it did not relinquish. Pete Metzelaars netted 45 points (still a DIII championship game record) and the Little Giants cruised to the national championship with an 83-62 win.

Recently, I asked Coach Petty what it was like to lead a team to a moment that, when it mattered most, every one of his guys delivered.

“It’s hard to put it into words,” he said. “It was like a dream. It just happens.”

The 1976-77 Wabash College basketball team. Coach Mac Petty is in the back row (far right), while Bob Knowling is front row (third from the left/#12).

That dream was built with hard work, practice, and time spent together forging a bond, that when tested, would not be broken. Championships don’t happen by accident.

Coaches are measured by victories, or championships won, especially in March. Petty’s 541 wins and that national title secure his championship legacy. However, the impact on his players is measured differently.

Bob Knowling ’77 was a standout football and basketball player at Wabash, and was a rising senior when Petty was named the head coach in 1976. They spent one season together in 1976-77, and it turned out to be a memorable one for Knowling.

“I bought into you and your vision totally when you arrived in Crawfordsville and it was an easy decision for me to choose between football and basketball,” he wrote to Petty in an e-mail prior to the 1982 team’s 35-year reunion in January. “Even being a three-year starter on the football team, my love of basketball and the opportunity to play for you was exciting. While we won more games than any of my previous three years, the lessons I learned from you are what I remember most. Thank you for investing in me and for pushing me. It made a difference. Know that you influenced hundreds of young men to be great, including that championship team.”

Forty years later, Petty’s impact still resonates with Knowling.

“I played on numerous teams and played multiple sports,” he said, “yet when people ask me who I played for I only mention one name: Coach Petty.”


‘Three Time’ And So Much More

Nicknames and sports kind of go hand-in-hand, so it’s not surprising that someone on campus refers to Riley Lefever ’17 as “Three Time.” When you win three individual national championships, monikers like that are bound to follow.

It’s Riley’s response to sharing the story that sheds light on the person behind that championship veneer.

“I find it a little embarrassing,” he says. “I try to shy away from that stuff.”

Yes, Riley is a top-notch student-athlete, the leader of a nationally ranked wrestling team. He is also an English major who dabbles in poetry and has plans to teach following graduation, as well as the head resident assistant on campus, overseeing Rogge Hall, so his impact is far reaching.

Riley Lefever ’17 in Center Hall.

According to Associate Dean of Students Marc Welch, Riley relates well to a variety of people with the ability to lead through his words and actions. His attitude is contagious.

“As an R.A., Riley is naturally caring and concerned for others,” Welch says. “He is an encourager while at the same time holding them to a high standard.”

Fellow R.A. Brian Parks ’18 understands the commitment and integrity that goes into the job, and he witnessed some of those qualities at their first meeting.

“He automatically makes the room more relaxed,” says Parks. “Even though the job is stressful, he tries to put everybody at ease. He cracks jokes, but at the same time, he is a leader. He keeps us in order and makes sure we’re on task.”

One of Lefever’s character traits surprised Parks. Riley is a goof ball.

“He’s goofy. He seems to put a smile on your face every time you walk by,” Parks explains. “You can be yourself with him, and that translates very well to being an R.A.”

Chris Wilson ’19, who claims Riley as both a teammate and an R.A., says that Lefever earns respect on the mat and in Rogge Hall because of who he is, “You can look at him and tell that he’s athletic. I mean, he’s big and strong, but I don’t think everybody realizes how unique he is. He’s laid back. We respect him because he allows us to be ourselves.”

As Riley shoots for a fourth consecutive national championship and a B.A. degree this spring, one professor noted the attributes that help him stand out athletically and as a mentor, also aid him in the classroom.

“The excellent work ethic no doubt helps him in athletics, but it also defines him as a student,” says Agata Szczeszak-Brewer, Associate Professor of English. “He is a good listener, and his responses to texts or to other students’ comments are detailed and always respectful. I view Riley as a humble, down-to-earth guy who never brags about his achievements.”

Riley has impacted the Wabash community in a number of ways, but he is quick to point out the positive effects on him along the way, too.

“Being an R.A. has made me more approachable. I enjoy being able to impact young men’s lives,” “To be someone to talk to – to be a presence in their lives – has made me who I am. These experiences have shaped me as a person, a learner, an educator, and a leader.”


Scholarship Impacts Felt Around the World

Three Wabash students spent last semester abroad as part of the Gilman International Scholarship program. While each resided in vastly different locations, they returned to campus with a similar thought: the connections made through cultures, people, and experiences made for a rich experience.

“The education, trips, and, most importantly, the different cultures to which I was exposed made this experience very enlightening and eye-opening,” said Rodolfo Solis ’18, who was based in Valencia, Spain. “As a result, this led me to appreciate the Spanish language and literature much more.”

Much of that appreciation can be seen in the interactions with people, whether it be host families or strangers met while traveling.

Dominick Rivers at the Great Pyramids of Giza.

While on a trip to Cairo, Egypt, Dominick Rivers ’19 was on a run at the Great Pyramids of Giza, when he befriended a watchman named Nasar, who took him to parts of the site not available to the general public. From there, Rivers shared a dinner with his family, viewed Nasar’s artwork – a sculptor – and meditated.

“It was truly a fantastic experience that affirmed an already held belief,” said Rivers, who was based in Prague, Czech Republic. “As humans, we are in this together just to make life that much easier and enjoyable for one another.”

Solis was moved during a visit to Peñiscola, Spain. The town holds a noteworthy castle that dates back to the Crusades, and was recently featured prominently on HBO’s Game of Thrones. Such a journey was like a trip through time, according to Solis.

“I was able to do something that I never thought was possible, set foot in a historical monument previously used for an event that took place a little over 900 years ago,” he said.

Immanuel Mitchell-Sodipe ’18 spoke of shared experiences with his host family while in Guatemala. He remembered conversations with his host mother, Rubi, and connections made when discussing the issues that affect the poor and underrepresented.

Immanuel Mitchell-Sodipe  snaps a photo in Guatemala.discussing the issues that affect the poor and underrepresented.

“The world seems smaller, like people share my politics and experiences,” he said “People love, and they imagine a better world.”

Two of Wabash’s Gilman Scholarship recipients had traveled outside the United States previously. For Rivers, it was his first trip abroad, and he appreciated the familiarity he discovered.

“There might be a lot of land and sea that separates us, but deep down we are all looking for the same thing – to enjoy the time we have and to make it last,” he said.


Your Sense of Place in the World

Richard Paige — I felt like Bob Royalty’s REL 290 immersion trip to Israel needed closure, and the podcast and this blog were deemed necessary to finally and properly wrap my arms around all that an immersion experience could be.

I waited 10 days after we returned from Israel to schedule a podcast recording to give those shared experiences a chance to marinate a bit in their mind. The best part is that even 10 days later, the guys were just as engaged and thoughtful as they had been when we were in country.

We were midway through the podcast recording itself when the question hit me, so I scribbled it at the bottom of my notes to make sure that I remembered to ask it: what did trip do for your sense of place in the world?

Your sense of place in the world. Their words are better than mine.

(From left) REL 290 students Jimmy Suess, Aaron Becker, Anthony Douglas, Tim Riley, and Cameron Glaze during the podcast recording.

Anthony Douglas ’17: After this trip, the world for me became a little smaller. I realized that many of the problems we face in our own country aren’t just confined to what happens in America. The things that are happening here are happening everywhere. I saw a lot of the issues that the people of Palestine are facing in my own struggle as an African American. After this trip, I realized that people inherently are not much different from each other. This being my first time out of the country, I expected to meet people that were completely different from me, people who we had not much in common – almost aliens, you know – but I realized that the world is much smaller than we think.

Aaron Becker: ’17: It gave me a perspective of myself as being a very small piece of a much bigger puzzle. Though our time here at Wabash is valuable, though our experiences are fantastic and it is meaningful, in the grand scheme of things, the world’s a lot bigger than all of us. Though we are a very small part of it, we can make a difference. We can still listen to people on both sides. We can still have those conversations and, hopefully, it will help inspire people to make a difference in the lives of others.

Tim Riley ’18: For me it kind of made the world seem a little bit bigger. I’m coming from the same boat that this is my first international trip and I saw a lot more narratives that we need to hear out and a lot more adventures that we need to go on so that we have a broader understanding of everybody’s different backgrounds and stories and how that all comes together to produce the society that we live in today.

Jimmy Suess ’17: (What) I really took away most from this was not to take my freedom for granted. In this, I realize the responsibility that I have to do as much work that I can to promote the most good that I can in my life because there are people who don’t have the same fortune out there to be able to do what they want and help others.

Cameron Glaze ’17: I’d like to compare it to if you are wearing your fraternity letters and you go out and do something bad, you are going to have a negative light shined on you and who you represent. Going to Palestine and hearing what they had to say about our election and our government really made me think that while we are very lucky to be in the country that we are, we still have things to improve upon and before we can help other people, we need to help ourselves first.

In hindsight, it’s kind of disappointing that I didn’t think of the question sooner, as these answers address the essence of what makes immersion trips valuable. They are unique. They are intimate. They are insightful. It took less than four minutes for these five guys to generate these thoughtful responses, but they speak volumes to the sort of impact these trips have.


Puzzled by a crossword? Look to math.

Christina Franks — A crossword puzzle is solved one word at a time. Letter by letter, the answers start coming together. And with more letters comes more answers. How do we know? Math.

Crosswords vary in their degree of difficulty, so under what conditions can that person expect to be able to complete solve a puzzle?

Dr. John McSweeney of the Mathematics Department at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology set out to find that answer a while ago and shared his findings with Wabash students and faculty on Tuesday.

crosswordsWhat McSweeney was able to prove was that, dependent on a puzzle’s difficulty level, there is a certain number of letters from clues that, once obtained, will make a crossword puzzle almost completely solvable.

“Mathematics is really not about numbers – it’s about patterns,” Professor of Mathematics & Computer Science Emeritus David Maharry said. “And a crossword puzzle has huge patterns in it once you start looking.”

The graphs McSweeney used also showed the initial qualities of a puzzle can be so random that a person, even if he or she is not great at solving the crossword one day, the next day might be better. Even if the crossword puzzles are of the same difficulty level, if that person is able to figure out more clues or the letter arrangements make a bit more sense, McSweeney’s research shows that the second day’s puzzle just might go smoother than the last.

McSweeney used crossword puzzles from the New York Times, where Crawfordsville native and 2010 honorary Wabash graduate Will Shortz serves as the crossword puzzle editor. He graduated from Indiana University with the nation’s only degree in Enigmatology, and just a few years later, at age 25, Shortz founded the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament.

So if math has shown that once a person gets a certain amount of letters a puzzle becomes completely solvable, Shortz might have to start making sure the Times’ crosswords are even more puzzling.


A Story, a Stage, a Starring Role

Richard Paige — Sometimes, it’s just meant to be, and so it was with the upcoming production of Peter and the Starcatcher.

Wabash College is the first collegiate theater company in Indiana to produce the show on campus. The rights for the play that won five Tony Awards came open this year, and Assistant Professor of Theater Jessie Mills acted fast.

“I’ve had my eye on it for a while so we scooped it up when we had the chance,” she said. “Needless to say, I thought it would be a lot of fun for our students and a big change of pace.”

Rory Willats '17 during a recent dress rehearsal.

Rory Willats ’17 during a recent dress rehearsal.

As it turns out, Mills also had someone in mind to play the boy who never grew up, one best suited to handle the ragged and chaotic style that has become this musical play’s calling card.

Rory Willats ’17 is just that guy. He is no stranger to the Wabash stage, having occupied supporting roles in more than a handful of Wabash productions, but Peter and the Starcatcher will be his first leading role.

“I really think this is a role perfectly suited to me,” Willats said, “which is not to say that this process is a walk in the park by any means. Because it’s a high-energy, physical show and because there are parts of the boy I can see in myself, it isn’t at all easy for me. It’s also the first time in my career that I’m able to wrestle with a role in a show like this.”

The curtain rises on Peter and the Starcatcher on Oct. 5, and Mills is confident that Rory will inject something new into the prequel of Peter Pan, a story which nearly everyone is familiar.

“He is perfect in the role of Peter – a character who is as boyish and optimistic as he is frightened and vulnerable,” said Mills. “Rory has done a wonderful job pulling out the depth of complexities in Peter. I’m excited for audiences to see his performance.”


A Great Little Gem

Richard Paige — Even historical footnotes are memorable.

Late in the fourth quarter of Wabash’s 59-7 win over Allegheny on Sept. 17, a 5-foot-9 sophomore running back trotted onto the field for his first collegiate game action. His first carry netted a one-yard gain.

This particular back, Austin Hoover, was a good high school player, rushing for better than 2,600 yards as a senior at Sheridan (IN) High School. He’s been a hard worker at Wabash who shows up every day hoping to make himself and his teammates a little better.

Austin Hoover '19.

Austin Hoover ’19.

“I just set my mind to help out whoever is playing,” Hoover said. “If I’m on scout team that week, I’m going to do my best to make sure they get the best looks. If I get some reps on offense, I’m going to make those count. I’m making sure everything in practice counts in one way or another to help during the game.”

Three carries later, Hoover took the ball at the Wabash 32 yard-line and burst into the clear for a 47-yard gain, helping the Little Giants to a big piece of history. His scamper was the one that broke the single-game rushing record, originally set in 1975. Wabash ended the day with a whopping 513 yards on the ground.

“There was no better guy to set the school record than Austin Hoover,” said Wabash head coach Don Morel.

So what’s it feel like break off a big run where there is nothing in front of you but turf and the end zone?

Six of the guys pictured here helped Wabash rush for 513 yards on Sept. 17. Pictured above are (l to r): Bobby Blum '19; Tyler Downing '18; Isaac Avant '20; Shamir Johnson '17; Assistant Coach/RBs Darold Hughes; Matt Penola '19; Cam Morgan '20; Austin Hoover '19; and Lamore Boudoin '20.

Six of the guys pictured here helped Wabash rush for 513 yards on Sept. 17. Pictured above are (l to r): Bobby Blum ’19; Tyler Downing ’18; Isaac Avant ’20; Shamir Johnson ’17; Assistant Coach/RBs Darold Hughes; Matt Penola ’19; Cam Morgan ’20; Austin Hoover ’19; and Lamore Boudoin ’20.

“It’s a good feeling to know that you are getting open, but there is anxiety there as well that there could be someone coming up on you,” said Hoover, who finished the game with 57 yards rushing on four carries. “My thought process was ‘I am going to score in this play. I’m going for it.’”

While he was tripped up shy of the goal line, Hoover realized his carry was the record breaker just like everyone else: when it was announced to the stadium.

“When they announced it over the P.A., I kind of put two and two together that my run put it over,” he laughed. “It’s a good feeling to know that I was a part of the record breaking. Obviously, I wouldn’t be a part of it if it wasn’t for the other five backs who contributed.”

Coach Morel was all smiles while reviewing film two days later.

“Those guys down the depth chart, they practice hard and they really play hard when they get a chance,” said Morel. “A story like Hoover’s, it’s a great little gem.”


House ’16 Reflects on Interesting Ride

Richard Paige –In my three years on campus, Fabian House, as much as anyone, has been the face of Wabash College. The guy, like many here, is involved in seemingly everything: resident assistant, orientation leader, vice president of the student senate, student representative to the NAWM board, member of the Little Giant cross country and track and field programs, and a tour guide for Admissions.

Between the official and more informal tours, Fabian thinks he’s led more than 500 tours over the last three and a half years. Just think of how many future Wabash men’s first impressions were shaped by Fabian. Those tours are the primary reason I think of him as the current face of the College.

Fabian House '16

Fabian House ’16

With final exams complete and Commencement a few days away, I thought it would be interesting to see how Fabian, who will teach on the east side of Indianapolis next year, felt about his time on campus and the impacts he’s had. Below are his thoughts in his own words:

“I don’t feel like I’m done. I get the feeling that all of this is another step. I’m going to be off campus. I won’t be seeing the same sights here on campus that I’ve grown used to, like the tulip tree just outside Center Hall, and in the winter, the Milligan Clock beside Baxter Hall. I’m looking forward to being an alum, to being an ambassador for Wabash in a different way. I’m not going to be giving tours per se, I’m going to miss that for sure, but I hope, as a teacher working in the Indy area, that I’ll be able to at least guide students this way and make them seriously consider an all-male institution.”

“One of the biggest things I’m going to miss is fall at Wabash. The fall months are gorgeous, the leaves change, and so that is a beautiful moment for Wabash. I’m going to miss the Monon Bell Chapel, where the seniors talk about these formative years and how important it is to keep the Bell. I’m going to miss cross country and running on a team where we try to peak and run our best when it gets cold in the fall. Defending our regional championship this past season was probably my best athletic moment at Wabash. I’m going to miss Honor Scholarship Weekend as well. It’s a big introduction to Wabash – one I had and enjoyed – and is something that we’ve made very much a campus moment. Everyone knows what Honor Scholar is all about and everyone is excited for it.”

“At the banquet, they thanked me for my three and a half years of service and said I have given over 350 official tours on campus. That doesn’t count all of the unofficial tours I’ve given. I gave my last tour last Wednesday (April 27) and it was a really cool moment because I wasn’t going to tell the folks that it was my last tour. I told my first tour that it was because I felt like I needed to let them know that it was going to be an interesting ride. My last one was really special. After the son went into class, the parents thanked me, which happens occasionally, and said, ‘you said a lot of things and answered a lot of questions that made Wabash feel like a place that he would want to go.’ I got a little tearful. It’s my last tour and I get folks telling me that I gave a tour that made Wabash seem like an accessible place for their son. That’s how I want every tour to be. It’s not how many tours you give, it’s the impact you had in that 45 minutes you are with them.”

Fall and Honor Scholarship Weekend are just two of the things House will miss about Wabash.

Fall and Honor Scholarship Weekend are just two of the things House will miss about Wabash.

“I can’t imagine myself doing anything else right out of college other than teaching (in Indianapolis for Indiana Teaching Fellows). I’m happy that I’ll be close. I’m going to know guys in the next three graduating classes – guys I gave tours to, guys that I’ve come to know through classes. I don’t think you really are finally able to call yourself an alum and fully disconnect from Wabash as a student until you are able to look at a graduating class and know that you didn’t go to class with any of them. In many ways I still feel very connected to campus and the day-to-day activities.”

“At no one point do you think that you’re done. It won’t hit me until the summer that I’m a Wabash graduate.”


Wally Hoops Revisited

Crawfordsville is the home of basketball in the State of Indiana, having been imported here from Springfield, MA, shortly after the game’s invention. Such a lineage made the game a worthy topic of discussion at “Wally Hoops: A Slam Dunk Symposium on Basketball and the Liberal Arts,” on Feb. 19.

What follows below are some the most memorable quotes from our collection of speakers. Click here for an event photo gallery.

Mac Petty, Basketball From Beginning to Now
Speaking of Dr. James Naismith: “He went out and got two peach baskets and aren’t we lucky? The goal was to provide an athletic diversion during the harsh New England winter.”

“There were 13 original rules. Now, there are more than a hundred, but the spirit of those original 13 rules is still there. Big men have always made big changes to the game. Think Chamberlain, Kurland, George Mikan, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

“I don’t envy anyone being an official. When I started, basketball was finesse and football was a contact sport. Now, basketball is a contact sport and football is a collision sport. Maybe the Warriors and Spurs are helping to change that.”

Dr. Richard Dallinger, The Hoops Doctor Holds Court
“At the scorer’s table I was an actual game official. I took that very seriously. I had to turn off rooting for Wabash for 28 years. That was the hardest thing.”

Dr. Preston Bost, Outside the Box(score): Building a Better Basketball Team With Modern Analytics

Dr. Preston Bost spoke of basketball analytics and Charles Barkley.

Dr. Preston Bost spoke of basketball analytics and Charles Barkley.

“Analytics help you figure out the story within the game and its predictive value. The heyday of analytics of basketball began about 10 years ago. We’re still trying to figure things out. It’s kind of like watching a litter of puppies…lots of energy, but all over the place. We shouldn’t think of analytics as a magic wand. Analytics operates within certain constraints. Think of it as using technology to maximize your resources.”

“Charles Barkley is probably right to kind of slow play the analytics. It’s still such a young field.”

Mike Ricks ’87, “Hoosiers” and the Cutting Room Floor
“I read the script and I nailed it. I’d never done any acting but I took Dr. O’Rourke’s speech class.” “You never know when you’re on. You never know when you’re being interviewed. You always have to sell yourself.”

“I remember that coach (Mac Petty) was so supportive. He said, ‘You go do this life experience.’ It was one of the most boring days of my life. I would have rather been playing in the red/white scrimmage.”

Matt Tanney ’05, Learning to “Dance”: Building a Championship Culture in a Division I Basketball Program
“Why is it important to qualify for the NCAA Tournament? Not the money or exposure, but for the student-athletes and the quality of their experience.”

“Scheduling is a real challenge for us. You have to be strategic as to where and when you play people.”

“’It’s our job to make sure the student-athletes have the resources in place to be successful after graduation. It’s a process and it takes patience and perseverance.”

Joe Hakin ‘73, Basketball as a Process: The Score Will Take Care of Itself
“I haven’t lost a game in 14 years. It’s different when you are the head coach and the W/L is attached to your name.”

“Playing to your potential is an elusive goal, but a worthy one. Especially at a place like this, a liberal arts college, it is definitely worth pursuing.”

“On a liberal arts campus, it’s important to reorient students from their academic day to their athletic day. It’s tough to go from class to practice and be immediately successful.”

David Phillips H’83 and Brent Harris H’03, Wabash Basket Ball: The First 30 Years
“I consider Homer Stonebraker ’18 to be one of the greatest players at Wabash,” said Phillips. “He could shoot from anywhere.”

Of Pete Vaughan H’54, Phillips said, “He was the real deal.”

Ray Jovanovich ’84, Asia’s NBA Love Affair…From the Late 1980s to 2016 & Beyond
“I got my start at WNDY and little did I know that a few years later I’d be sitting across a dinner table with the Managing Editor at RTHK in Asia. At the time, they were expanding content in sports. I was in a very coveted position. For me, it became a love affair as well. That love affair was spurred on in 1982 with Mac Petty’s national championship team. I was fortunate to fall into this second career and it’s sort of become my no. 1 career now.”

“'(Former NBA Commissioner David) Stern understood the domestic needs for the game and saw the potential for growing the game overseas. He and his team were brilliant marketers. No one has come close to what the NBA has done in China.”

Drs. Annie Strader and Matthew Weedman, Man-Made Hoops: Artistic Responses to a Cultural Phenomenon
“No artist has complete control over the artistic interpretation of their art,” said Strader.

Talking about Higher Goals 1986 by David Hammonds, Strader said, “It’s an anti-basketball sculpture.”

Dr. Chris Carr ’82, Mental Toughness: The Role of Sport Psychology in the NBA

Dr. Chris Carr '82 delivered the event's keynote address.

Dr. Chris Carr ’82 delivered the event’s keynote address.

“Sport psychology gives athletes something they can put to good use. The strategies we teach give them the tools to equip them for the rest of their lives…We try to help athletes develop these attributes: determination, confidence, composure, and focus.”

“When I work with an athlete, I have specific strategies to deal with things that are tough or overwhelming. What gets players engaged is using those skills and attributes to their advantage.”

“We have great weight rooms and strength staffs, but how much time do we spend on the mental? It’s easy to start, but it’s hard to commit.”

“Basketball is a fascinating sport. It’s dynamic and fluid. It’s about one shot, one point, and one stop. I try to help make every team member better, including coaches.”

The faculty, staff, and alumni symposium is presented by the National Association of Wabash Men, the Indianapolis Association of Wabash Men, and the faculty and staff of Wabash College.



1 2 3 4