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“Gorgeous, disturbing, and grippingly alive”

Jim Amidon — I read Joy Castro’s powerful memoir The Truth Book quite some time ago, before it was in print. I knew instantly that it had the grace and muscle to attract a large reading audience. Just before its release, The Truth Book was named a "Notable Book" by Booksense.

And the word is spreading.

In Sunday’s Boston Globe, Caroline Leavitt wrote about Castro’s book in her regular Sunday column, "A Reading Life." This week’s column was titled "Rewriting damaged lives with eloquence and truth," and featured Castro’s book along side Floyd Skloot’s A World of Light.

Leavitt called the English professor’s book "an exquisitely powerful and beautifully written memoir."

And:

"Castro, like Skloot, moves effortlessly back and forth through memory, as she tries to ”feel my way into what it all means." Glimpses of her future spark and glint amid the rubble of her past, and she even imagines a richly evocative monologue from her heartbroken birth mother. Castro not only saves herself from her brutal childhood, she saves her brother. And when she has a son, she gives him the childhood she and her brother never had a chance for. Her son is doted on, never struck or scolded. ”Sweetheart, this is what you deserve," she tells him.

"Gorgeous, disturbing, and grippingly alive, Castro’s book offers the kind of hope her background never supplied."

Just a quick reminder that the Wabash Bookstore has plenty of copies, and that Joy will read from The Truth Book on October 27 at 8:00 p.m. in Salter Concert Hall.

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