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What Makes Wabash

The actual demographic readings of Wabash do not fully express the diversity here. The few foreigns students here dilute the student population more than you think.
It’s the beginning of the 6th week this Monday and some of the best times I have had so far are talking with eastern Asians about life back home. The topic of these questions vary from “What do you think about your communist president” to . . . typical guy questions.
Here at Martindale there is a Chinese guy, a guy from Vietnam and another guy from South Korea. This week my friend and I were talking to Thanh from Vietnam. One story that struck me was about a women who was imprisoned for distributing pamphlets.That in its self was a shock but when he said the pamphlets were about democracy, it got me thinking about how unappreciative many of us Americans are.
Before I had heard that story my views on the NSA were that they should listen and be allowed to go through all my calls and emails. My mindset was, “I’m no terrorist, what do I have to hide?” But many times we do not understand how privileged we are until we lose or hear about others that do not share our privileges. Privacy and freedom are two of the many ways that Americans like to distinguish themselves from the rest of the world. Even writing about this now, I realize the extent of my privileges. These rights and privileges we Americans possess and take for granted are not universal. They are most of the time are specific to the America.
That’s what makes Wabash, well Wabash. At Wabash we are always in the classroom even outside of the classroom. Being comprehensive and understanding about other cultures and countries is a learning experience you can’t get from a textbook. These one on one conversations are stories I will remember in 20 years. They will be what makes me appreciative, understanding, and knowledgable about what others live through. ┬áPeoples views on real life world issues are much more interesting and enriching when those people speak about their own experiences.